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What does “try “mean in this  paragraph ? I’m learning about infer an imply I kinda know what they mean already ?

All I need to know is what do they mean by someone will try to tell you something i never knew you could try to tell someone something either u tell them or don’t . An the only try I know of is try - an effort to do something 

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8 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    "an" does not mean "and".

    It's baby talk.

    Kinda is not a word.

    It's also baby talk.

    "try" (a verb) means "attempt" (a verb).

  • 1 month ago

    The word try usually indicates a means to fail or failure. 

    Have you ever heard a lawyer or a doctor say they will try to save you?

    Does your therapist say they will try to help you? 

    Do your financial institutions and creditors say they will try to approve your loan?

  • RP
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    There is a significant difference between trying or attempting to do (whatever) and doing it. In this context, the use of try suggests there is a doubt about whether the person is capable of doing it.

  • 2 months ago

    'I tried to tell you' can mean that I told you but you were unable to hear me, or that I told you but you weren't listening, or that you refused to accept that what I was telling you was something that mattered.

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  • 2 months ago

    If taken literally, this really doesn't make sense. You are correct. There is no 'trying', you either say a thing or you don't. 

    What this actually means is that someone is trying to explain something to someone, or possibly trying to warn someone about something. Context would be as follows:

    I have tried and tried to tell Chris that binge drinking will only do more harm than anything, but he chose not to listen and now he is behind bars for drunk driving and hitting a pedestrian. 

    Trying means that someone is just not getting the point of the issue across no matter how they try.

  • JuanB
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Ah.  so you are straight out of the Yoda school of thought.  

    "Do or Do not.  There is no try"

  • 2 months ago

    You are correct. People often use those words when what they mean is 'attempt to explain'

  • 2 months ago

    Try to communicate the idea, is what "try to tell" actually means.  The idea of tell is communicate information.  Well, clearly, it is possible to fail at communication of information even if you tell using words you think are more than adequate.  Your words may not do the job as you intended.

    Imply is to hint at, infer is to interpret from.

    Inference is an interpretation on our side of the communication as to the meaning. Implication is an effort from the other side of the conversation to send meaning.

    Infer means we interpret from what was said or done.  Imply means they say or do something to send an idea.  It is quite possible to infer something completely different from what the other person was trying to imply, which is the fundamental weakness of indirect speech.  It can fail to communicate what was intended to be communicated.

    Trying to tell does not mean you are actually telling. You only think you are when you aren't.  That is why it is often kind of useless to say "That is what I am telling you" when people fail to understand.  Clearly, you are NOT telling them if they aren't understanding, you are trying to tell them, but you are not succeeding. The words being used haven't done the job you expected of them.  Might not even be your fault.  Communication has two or more people involved, and failure occurs whenever any one of them does not get it right.

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