Yahoo Answers is shutting down on 4 May 2021 (Eastern Time) and, as of 20 April 2021 (Eastern Time), the Yahoo Answers website will be in read-only mode. There will be no changes to other Yahoo properties or services, or your Yahoo account. You can find more information about the Yahoo Answers shutdown and how to download your data on this help page.

Can I leave my lease early? ?

I need some advice. I'm currently living with the landlord and am renting a room in their house. A lease was signed for a year, but I want to leave. I'm nearly 6 months into the lease. I'm fed up with them. Their clean freaks to the point of being beyond a joke. I'm clean tidy don't cause any problems and am quiet. I keep to myself and mind my own business. All bills and rent are paid on time.

I understand its their house and I know people will say if you don't like it then leave or we'll tough you live in their house. They're nit picking at stupid things. It feels like I'm being controlled and you will obey me. I get the silent treatment from them or they wait until I leave the room and then they go into the room. It's pathetic. I'm the first person to live with them and feel sorry for the next person. I could go into the ridiculous things of what their like but don't have enough space. 

My question is can I leave my lease early? Give a month's notice and then leave? If I leave early will I have to pay the remaining months because the lease was broken early? 

Thanks 

15 Answers

Relevance
  • ?
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    An early termination fee is typically two month's worth of rent. ... Many early termination of lease clauses include an early termination fee. However, you don't have to include the option of paying a fee—you may simply require they pay rent until you find a replacement tenant.

  • 1 month ago

    Yes, a lease or rental agreement is a type of contract. Any contract can be broken by one party, knowing that the other party(ies) may seek compensation for damages.

    In your case, you may want to discuss your options with the landlord: arrange to have a replacement tenant take over your lease, mutually agree to a "termination fee", or simply give notice and move out.

    It is COMPLETELY up to the landlord whether to waive any part of the agreed rent or to sue you for all of it.

    The landlord suing for rent will have the burden of proving "damages", under the lease and the applicable state laws. In most states, the law will not permit a landlord to pile on damages by simply leaving the room vacant and they must prove they have at least attempted to find another tenant who qualifies. 

    If it comes to being sued, your own attorney may assist you in clarifying your own defenses and counterclaims, other than what YOU think the landlord may have done wrong.  That may result in a a reduction of the amount the court will award to the landlord, if not also a REFUND of rent you paid for "quiet enjoyment" of your home, which was not provided as required by law.  We don't know your specific laws or circumstances, but you may want to discuss things with a local attorney before you negotiate with the landlord (iron fist in the velvet glove).

    Bottom line: you can leave any time you want, but the landlord then has the option to bill you for more rent, and to sue you if you don't pay.  Some landlords simply don't care enough to sue, and just go ahead and rent it to someone new, writing off the unpaid rent against their business profits.

  • 1 month ago

    Usually when you leave a lease early you have to give notice and you normally lose your deposit 

  • 1 month ago

    Talk to them and find out if there will be a penalty for leaving early--that's your first step. You don't have to be confrontational--just let them know this isn't working out for you. Likely you WILL have to pay the remaining months on the lease. But it's worth a try. 

  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • ?
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    only as long as you pay out the lease or the owner agrees and lets you , but highly unlikely , the owner then has the cost of getting a new  leaser .the minute you sign a lease its legally binding .

  • 1 month ago

    You can leave your lease any time you want.  Can you leave it without penalty?  No.

  • n2mama
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Yes, you can leave your lease early. Yes, it will cost you money to do so. How much it will cost you depends on several things. First, does you lease contain an early termination clause? If it does, you would notify the landlord, pay the fee specified in the lease (often the equivalent of 2-3 months rent), then move out. If your lease doesn’t contain an early termination clause you would need to speak to your landlord. If they are willing to let you break your lease, they can tell you what it will cost to do so, then you can decide if it’s worth it or not. You can just move out and expect to be sued. How much the landlord wins (because they would win, your issues are not legal grounds to be released from a lease early without penalty) will depend on your state. Worst case is that yes, you could be responsible for the remainder of the lease, plus court costs if it goes to court.

  • 1 month ago

    You can leave the property at any time, but you cannot leave the lease without financial penalty.  You can be ordered by a judge to pay up to the time a replacement tenant, with good faith effort on the part of the landlord to find one, takes occupancy. In other words, a landlord cannot let the place sit empty and expect to be awarded the entire remaining rent.  But if it ts three months from the time you stop paying, then the landlord can be awarded that three months rent by a judge - plus the landlord's legal expenses in bringing you to court.

  • R P
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You can move because no one can force you to stay.

    If your lease contains an early termination clause, pay the fees as outlined and move.

    If not, ask your landlord how much it will cost you to break the lease. Then pay what they say & move.

    If neither is an option, read your state's landlord/tenant laws. Some states require the landlord to mitigate their damages if you break the lease  but not all do.  For example, Florida does not, so your landlord could conceivably hold you to the terms of the lease.

  • 2 months ago

    Er, no - this isn't a valid reason to break a lease. 

    If you leave, you'll have to pay the remainder of the lease. 

Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.