Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationInsurance & Registration · 1 month ago

Bought a motorcycle of craigslist but the vin on title is missing a letter and has a wrong number.?

Hi.

I bought it from a guy named X in oregon, he bought it from a guy named Y in washington. X didn't register it in oregon. X gave me bill of sale and the washington title which both signed by Y and x signed me a bill of sale also. 

Then after I bought it, I found out that in the title there is one number missing and another mistake where they typed 8 instead of B. It is very hard to see the vin on the bike. Bike is 14 years old if it matters. 

I live in oregon. Any thoughts on how to fix this or where to start? I mean when I go for vin inspection and it comes out not matching what do I expect from the dmv? No plates on the bike and washington title says it was previously registered in oregon. I ran a vin check and it is clean no accident and is not stolen. I have no access contact to x or y.

Thanks.

12 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You got scammed.  Park the bike near a junkyard to end your misery.

  • Phil M
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Titles need to be signed AND notarized. Buying a vehicle withouy the properly completed paperwork will cause problems if you ever try to license it. If the vin on the title doesn't match the number on the frame, any info you found out about it is invalid. The bike is most likely stolen. Better talk to a lawyer.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You got scammed.  Park the bike near a junkyard to end your misery.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Turn the steering hard over to the left or right. Behind the headlight on the frame of the bike is a large white sticker....which shows the VIN, bike maker, GVW.  That sticker has been on bikes since the 60's? or earlier? 14 years means new.  I quit riding way before that time.

    How did you do a VIN check without knowing the number?

    Move the wiring out of the way from the headlight and you can see the VIN.  It says V.I.N.   Take "that number" to the cop shop and have them do a reported Theft check on the bike.  Their computers go across state lines and other countries.   If it comes back clean, then you move on to the next stage.  It has been awhile since I did it so accuracy may not be spot on but "bear with me" ...I believe you go to your local DMV and tell them you want to re-register the motorcycle(because of the error in the VIN which you SHOW THEM WHAT THE ACTUAL NUMBER IS AND WHAT YOU got for a Title papers.  Now, it MAY be an issue with them and it may not.  You are trying to satisfy THEM. The B & the 8 is not a big thing for they know the VIN is 6 or 9 numbers(I'm not counting how many numbers it is) THEY know...the sequence.

    "The bill of sale" they do not care if you paid $5 or $50,000,000,000.00 for it.   It is your receipt. Once the bike is titled in your name the BoS is a useless piece of paper.  Basically once you got it out of the seller's yard, it is your only proof you paid for the bike. Until you get it home...and titled.  Otherwise the seller could report the bike stolen to the cops and they would be after you as you are pushing or trailering the bike home. That BoS has the sellers signature on it and the date. So he can't claim his bike was stolen when in fact he did receive money. It is your PROOF.

    . Getting back to the DMV...when you ask to re-register the bike, one requirement was reporting to the cop shop to have a search done. You did that and got a piece of paper on a "records check"

    . DMV may tell you about a second stage which is it is posted in your "local newspaper" under "classifieds Lost & Found" (I believe) that you "found" a Kawasaki motorcycle. The rightful owner can claim it at. Phone #. with further identification.  Usually that will be the registration papers...with the correct VIN#  and engine size, & color of the bike.  This information you did not give out....so for them to guess correctly on that stuff means it is their machine. & they have the paperwork to prove that they owned it.    That ad is kept in the newspaper for 2 weeks.   No rightful claims, then you pull the ad.  Then you go back to DMV with proof you had the ad for 2 weeks as you get a receipt from the newspaper as it cost you money for 2 WEEKS.  It also cost using the cops for a "records check" back then for me back then in my town.   The DMV now had the proof required you tried to find the legal owner but no luck.   

    . Good enough.   DMV can make a new title to YOU.

    . Is there a number stamped into the frame? Not that I know of. The number on the engine casing down by left foot is the engine number, not the frame number, so totally useless.

    You now can get a plate for the bike and insurance...if it is a road bike.  You did not say dirt or street.

    The DMV rules in your state or country may be different somewhat but you follow what THEY say.

    You are only going to do this ONCE in your life(most likely)

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  • Scott
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You bought a vehicle with an open title. You're screwed. Stupidity can be expensive.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    The Title isn't wrong, you just don't have that bike. Yours is stolen.

  • May
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Buying a cycle without first checking the VIN on the title with the VIN on the bike and then on top of it buying a bike with the title being jumped not just once but twice (or more?) is foolish and just plain stupid.  I think your foolishness just bought you a whole pile of trouble.

    Good luck.  You will need it. 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You should never buy a vehicle with a flipped title. Life lesson. Sell it for scrap.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    YOU MESSED UP. Only a dealer can legally reassign a title. The person you bought it from couldn't legally re-sell it without titling it in their name first. The bill of sale you got is pretty much worthless as far as the DMV is concerned. All you can do is part it out. 

  • 1 month ago

    Then you haven't bought it.  All you've done is to give someone money.  Buying consists of paying someone who has a title with the correct, matching VIN, and getting a title with the correct, matching VIN.  You now may own the bike, somewhere in the world, that has the VIN that is on this title, but not the bike that you have.

    The VIN check only tells you that it has not yet been reported stolen.  That does not mean that it is not stolen.

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