Do you still warm up your car?

I can understand if you want the car to be warm when you get in it, but did you know it warms up faster when you’re driving it? It’s also bad for the environment as idling as one of the worst ways of polluting when operating the vehicle? Did you know it’s bad for the car? Old cars that had mechanical chokes back in the 70s and before had to be warmed up, but modern cars don’t need this. Would you stop if it bothered your neighbors? Do you want to waste gasoline?

22 Answers

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  • Murzy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    Just drive it at low speeds to warm it up.

  • 2 months ago

    I do warm it for about a minute. But it also seems to be a myth as it was only needed in earlier cars which have carburetors and not having the modern electronic controls but it is now not necessary to warm up the engine as after the mid-1940s wasn’t absolutely necessary due to modern enging.

  • 2 months ago

    Yes, i do, let it on idle for a minute

  • 2 months ago

    Yes, I do. i waste a whole 2 ounces of gas doing it, while I check the mirrors, clear the glass and put on my belt. Once I get going I want for you to stay out of my way.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    At times, yes. If its 39 outside and I have to get my fiancé, I dont want her to have to sit in  in a "cold car".

    If I am in a hurry, No.

    This "polluting environment/hard on car " is Non Sense. Oughta report you for lying. Older cars w/chokes and carbs,  if you did Not hit gas immediately after starting; Yes, could wash some oil  off cyls. Many Required a warm up or slow, stumbling, maybe even Stall in cold weather.

    Modern EFIs, NO. Hardly any more pollution at idle than at 60. A Bit richer, yes, but far more controlled.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    No Never have even in Germany My Mercedes-Benz 220 drove off straight away there is No reason to warm up an engine it only causes wear to a cold engine 

  • 2 months ago

    Years ago we had to let the engine get a little heat in it to assist the carburetor and because of the oils used.   

    Now days its not required yet you have to consider your circumstances.  If you are in a cold environment then letting it idle for a minute or two will help get the oil moving around the engine.  I use this time to put on my seat belt,  put my phone in its holder and connect it if need be and adjust the heater.  They drive easy for a while at least until you see the temperature is rising. 

    In warmer climates while you can start and drive,  again I start then set myself up and then again drive easy for a while. 

    The worst thing we can do is to jump in,  start the engine and then drive hard. 

  • 2 months ago

    My daily driver doesn't require warming up - so the only time I start it ahead of time is when it is a block of ice, so when I come out it is already thawed, and I can just jump in and take off.

    My beater pick-up has to warm up for a minute, otherwise it won't move when you put it into gear.

    My '65 Mustang 289 coupe has to warm up for a few minutes - but it has a carburetor with a choke.  If I haven't started it in a while, I'll sometimes adjust the distributor to advance the timing a little bit, and it helps it get going.  My engine is so well balanced that I can adjust the timing by ear.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    "Most engine wear occurs at cold-start and during the first few minutes of operation."

    Taking out on the road immediately and putting a load on the engine too quickly is a recipe for higher wear.  You claims are FALSE.

    Getting in a warm car is a good thing. 

  • 2 months ago

    Way to go with a useless post jojo. Screw the neighbors. I'll wager you waste more of our environment nit picking at everything your see. 

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