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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferencePrimary & Secondary Education · 3 months ago

Is there a strong likelihood that there is a link between the fact that children are now seen to be killing other children, ....?

.... for the slightest reasons, whilst parents and teachers are no longer supposed to use physical punishment in the home or schools?

7 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    while the statistical 'evidence' seems compelling, it is far from the only possible explanation and, afaik, there have been no scientifically sound studies in the area.

  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    The reasons why kids kill other kids (and adults) are very complex, and have little to do with the lack of corporal punishments in schools. If you're asking why school shootings happen, the answer is that they are motivated by one thing and one thing alone: A desire for REVENGE for some act or acts, whether REAL or IMAGINED, by the person or people doing the shooting. THAT is the common denominator which ties every single school shooting that has been seen in the United States over the past 25 to 30 years together. Even Columbine, which was originally planned as a BOMBING and not a shooting, was motivated by the killers' desire for REVENGE. They'd endured YEARS of mistreatment and abuse, not to mention bullying, by their classmates, teachers, and school administrators. And they were both mentally ill at the time of their crimes- the younger shooter had been showing signs of serious mental illness since he was 9 years old. Their main motivator, however, was revenge. Columbine wasn't about guns or gun access, contrary to what most of the political types believe. It wasn't about violent video games, either. It was about revenge, first and foremost. And so were all of the other major shootings we've seen.

    I've been watching this same pattern of revenge motivated shootings happen repeatedly for years, even the past couple of decades. I can't help but wonder when people are ever going to wake up and realize that the only way to stop the carnage is to deal with the real causes of it. Arming teachers isn't the answer. More cops in school isn't the answer. Making kids wear bulletproof backpacks isn't the answer. Dealing with the real CAUSES of the problem IS. Mental illness, bullying, and the poisonous school culture are what need to CHANGE.

  • Frank
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    When I was a child (born early 1940s in the U.K.) discipline was harsh both at home and in schools.  One teacher we had in junior school terrified us by the way he hit 'naughty' children, He would hit them across their head and sometime use a can, we were petrified of him.  Headteachers could use the cane or the strap as physical punishment (now teachers cannot even give a small slap on the naughty child's hand).  At home, in that same era, up until the late 1990s, a man could beat his wife as hard as he liked (using his hand, fist or an implement)  providing that he did not actually kill her - only then would the police intervene. 

    My father knocked me unconscious when I was 7 years old.  He hit me so hard that I went 'flying' off the stool I was sitting on and into the corner of a wall cupboard.  When I came round I was on the floor (literally seeing stars) and my baby brother, who had been sitting on my lap when I was hit, was on the floor screaming.  Despite that I had to get myself up from the floor, pick up the baby and sit down on the backless stool again.  These incidents were not rare.  Mum worked a 3 hour evening shift 3 nights per week back then to earn a little extra money.  She'd have been devastated if she'd known how he sometimes treated us whilst she was out.

    Today's youngsters (in most cases) don't know what being hit by a parent feels like, therefore, they don't know what damage they might do when they decide to use fists or feet to hurt another child.  Without strict discipline used WITHOUT violence, children do not grow up in a truly 'healthy' way.  All children need to be disciplined and made aware that some behaviour patterns are bad and wrong. Once smacking was made illegal in the U.K. children did not know that such actions hurt, so they are not as aware as we would have been regarding the damage they can inflict by their actions.

    I don't like the idea of physical punishment returning to schools in the U.K. but I think that much of the trouble we have with teenagers now is that they have NEVER felt a hard smack across their bottom or the back of their hand - therefore, they don't know how much such actions can hurt.  They don't mind metering out their own violence because they know that their punishment (if they are caught) will not be physical.

  • 3 months ago

    while the statistical 'evidence' seems compelling, it is far from the only possible explanation and, afaik, there have been no scientifically sound studies in the area.

  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    Teachers vs students in the 1940's:

    Attachment image
  • 3 months ago

    There have always been child murderers.  Usually they have grown up without being taught that actions have consequences.  Physical punishment is a way of teaching this - provided it is not used indiscriminately.  Our experts tell us that it is not the best way.

  • ?
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    And the link would be, less violence gives more violence? I think not...

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