Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 month ago

Did the Spanish flu help end the First World War?

or it had nothing to do with the war's outcome. thx. 

9 Answers

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  • JOHN B
    Lv 6
    4 weeks ago

    The majority of deaths happened after the war ended, into 1920, and started in Feb. of 1918 with the first case in the US. 

  • 4 weeks ago

    No.   Germany lost due to the USA coming into the war.  . 

  • 4 weeks ago

    No, the War helped spread the flu.

  • 4 weeks ago

    It was one reason that World War I ended.  It was such a health crisis that it forced all nations to be more willing to end the war.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Yes it did, thousands of troops were affected. The reason it is known as Spanish Flu is that Spain was the first country that was infected which was also neutral and therefore not covered by the censorship laws which stopped Allies and Central Powers from admitting it.

    So it had an influence in ending the war but was not the material cause, Germany was already close to defeat thanks to the Royal Navy blockade.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Nothing to do with the war's outcome. It compounded the ravages of war but that was it - the war ended for strategic and geopolitical reasons. Essentially, Germany's people withdrew their support for continuing as the Allied forces, with the US coming in late, began to take it to the Germans, and some of Germany's allies gave up.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    It began the year the war ended and affected some troops but it really took off after the war, as the movement of troops returning home took it with them into the civilian populations. The war ended because the Germans ran out of resources and support from their allies. 

  • ree
    Lv 4
    1 month ago

    Germany's generals staked their war fortunes on a major offensive in 1918, while the Allies planned for 1919. ... The failure of the Spring Offensive and the loss of her allies in mid- to late-1918 eventually resulted in a German surrender and the signing of a ceasefire on November 11th 1918. 

    This is how history records it. Is it possible casualties due to the virus contributed? ... sure, to some very limited degree but both sides were equally susceptible. Also, trump is the one making the claim how the flu ended the war. He also thinks the flu started in 1917. His credibility is not very good.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I'm no student of history, but we were taught* that the physical conditions of many areas where WWI was fought helped to spread the plague.

    (* - back in the 50s . . . just basic American History but probably a lot more than children today are taught:  I'm sure most have never heard of the Spanish Flu epidemic because they aren't taught any history . . . of course, my generation had the benefit of teachers who remembered that period, as did our parents/grandparents.  Kids today "learn" from those who remember Woodstock)

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