Why don't car makers put OBD code readers in the car to begin with?

A reader that works with your cellphone costs all of $15. Why don't they just install the darn things to begin with?

17 Answers

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  • 3 weeks ago

    To save money and to give the mechanics some easy business

  • 4 weeks ago

    $15?  - multiplied by tens (or hundreds) of thousands of vehicles?

    Manufacturers will switch to a cheaper clip or fastener if they can shave a fraction of a penny off of the cost of each vehicle.

    They could probably integrate one into the modern infotainment systems - but the other reason they don't want you to know what is wrong with your vehicle is so that you will bring it back to them to fix (and if it's not under warranty, they can charge you $$).

  • 4 weeks ago

    To save money and to give the mechanics some easy business. And btw, I bought my reader for 3 dollars.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Cost.  Multiply that by 30+million vehicles. So that is a big cost and not every one uses it or wants it.Enough of "Big Brother surveillance" for of course they will add an alcohol breath checker because government demands it.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    They don't want you to ever work on your own car. They make tons of money on selling service, but mainly, lots of folks will totally eff up things, then bring them to the shop and not say what they did, trying to get warranty work or other adjustments to their created problems.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Good idea. Most codes are cryptic; a running rich code  was traced to Bent Pushrods. Still have to use eyes a lot. Stupid ECM  read less  RPM per throttle plate opening than norm at that wheel speed and gear; so enrichened  mixture.  This made no difference in performance; O2 sensors said  "rich". 

  • 4 weeks ago

    Because most people waste their money trying to play mechanic. It takes more then reading a code to repair problems with the OBD II system.

  • CB
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    My 2000 Ford Focus would display (in flash code or something like that) the OBD problems codes on the dashboard. Had to have access to the flash codes but they were easy to find.

    I completely agree why not just display the codes detected on dash some where - plenty of LED displays that could be dual function (trip odometer for instance).

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    The last thing manufacturers want is for customers to be their own mechanics.

  • 4 weeks ago

    It is extra cost and hopefully they would use a better one than the $15.00 heco en China pos. They would still have to provide the current jack........ My Subaru alerts me to problems through the Starlink system already.

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