JSG asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 month ago

How do you signify possession for nouns ending with " 's"?

Hi. I'm curious about this. How do you signify possession for nouns ending with " 's"?

" 'S" usually signifies possession, as in "Gary's dog" or in "Martha's cat".

" 'S" is sometimes used to denote the plural of something, like in "X's and O's" or in "mind your p's and q's".

"Macy's", "McDonald's" and "Wendy's" are all proper nouns.

These are the names of fast food restaurants.

Since they all end with " 's" how would you signify something belongs to these restaurants in a sentence?

Would you put an apostrophe at the end of each name?

Please help. Thank you.

Update:

"Arby's", "McDonald's" and "Wendy's" are all proper nouns.

These are the names of fast food restaurants.

-FIXED.

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    1 month ago
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    This is a "rule" that has changed within my lifetime. You see that in a living language.

    With the exception of Jesus, Greek gods, and Roman gods, all singular nouns ending in s, including ending in ss, are made possessive with aspostrophe-s, just like other words.

    James's name is hard to type.

    Jess's burger is gone.

    The boss's rules are insane.

    He follows Jesus' rules.

    I follow Bacchus' rules.

    When a noun is already in possessive form, you don't add any additional punctuation to make it possessive.

    McDonald's is a fast food restaurant. McDonald's fries are popular.

    Macy's is the anchor tenant in the mall. Macy's prices are kind of expensive.

    Lego's are a creative toy. Lego's instructions are detailed.

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