how did indentured servitude differ from slavery?

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  • 5 months ago

    Indentured servitude was a good deal if you didn't have the money to get to the new world. Remember, their was no other recourse for getting over here unless you were a sailor that goes AWOL or had a buddy that could sneak you aboard, the penalty death. Today we think nothing about crossing the pond but these people were serious about it! A lot of indentured people bought up those free western lands years later after finishing these contracts. Traveling across the Atlantic by ship was very expensive in the olden days as well as the food and shelter you needed during and after arriving. With this deal you had transportation and a job when you got there, the boss that was bringing you over paid for it. You went to work for him and him exclusively. He was like an overseas contractor paying for your flight, per diem and other expenses. You just had to sign over a certain amount of years of your life working for him. We still have similar contracts like this today except we don't work for free anymore. Work was hard in the 19th century whether you got paid or not. There was some abuse with the system between the legal terminology about it being involuntary or voluntary so the politicians got involved, like they usually do, and made a note in the 13th amendment about ridding it completely. But this is how a lot of poor made it over to America and got rich later, many in California.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    you understand indentured servents owed money while slaves are purchased labour?

    ignore the weirdos and you figure it out.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Slaves never got paid Indentured did

    An indenture is a legal contract that reflects or covers a debt or purchase obligation. It specifically refers to two types of practices: in historical usage, an indentured servant status, and in modern usage, it is an instrument used for commercial debt or real estate transaction.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    From my understanding indentured workers are supposed to be paid at some point.  Slaves are people who have no choice but to work or suffer severe punishments and receive no compensation for their services.

      Back in past times a boy could be indentured to be an apprentice and would work for several years being taught a trade but his payment was being taught his trade and the boss paid for his food, clothing and gave him a place to sleep.  In past days a family could receive money for their boy to the navy.  The boy received no payment for the term of his indenture but learned the art of seamanship.

      Back in the late 1800s to early 1900s In northern Australia Pacific Islanders were indentured to work say 4 years on sugar cane farms to be paid for their service at the end of the agreed term.  Some farmers at the end of the term would put them on boats back to their island promising their money would be handed to them as they disembarked at their home island but when they got there they were thrown overboard and the boat sailed away and they were never paid.

      Around the same time Japanese men were indentured for say 4 years to dive in heavy diving suits for Pearl shells.  They would be paid at the end of the indenture term.  When their last dive of their indentured service was happening there were stories of some pearling captains cutting the air hose and rope and leaving them to drown to save paying for the indentured man's wages.

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  • 5 months ago

    Slaves were sold as people, not by their obligations.  And slaves could not buy their way to freedom. 

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Semantics, although some indentured servants were freed after 7 or more years many died in servitude or the contract was disregarded when their 'time' was up and they remained in servitude. The work was the same and indentured servants were treated just as harshly as slaves.

  • 5 months ago

    The uniforms were better with the first one, as were the holidays and medical benefits, especially dental.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    In 1619, not in the least.  Terms of servitude, and living conditions were identical, and. Both allowed freedom after 7 years.  Tell the yruth about the colonies.

  • Marli
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    If you mean by "slavery" lifelong servitude, the difference is that indentured servants are "slaves" for a period of time: 7 or 14 years. If he stole or ran away and was caught, the judge ruled an extension of the time of servitude.

     An indenture is a written labour contract between the apprentice or his parent or guardian and a master craftsman or a lord and lady. Apprentices served a master craftsman for a fixed period of time, learning his trade. The master got his labour. The apprentice got the instruction.  Girls of good birth served a lady as maids of honour, learning how to be ladies themselves. Boys learned to be squires, knights and courtiers by serving a lord.

    According to the Bible, defaulting debtors served their creditors for a period agreed upon according to Mosaic law. Twenty or thirty years sometimes. A year of jubilee was to cancel the remaining servitude and the debts.

    That was the sort of bondage a poor emigrant could have had - a contract between himself and the owner or captain of a ship. The owner or captain took him aboard and across the ocean to America. There the emigrant's labour (and person) was sold at auction to pay the owner/captain for his passage. The emigrant worked for the farmer or merchant. When the agreed time was completed, the contract usually stated that the immigrant received money or land that was worth the difference between the money paid the captain for his indenture contract + expenses + profit interest (there must be a profit to make it worthwhile to own a servant) and the worth of his labour.

    Chattel slavery was lifelong servitude. They were captured or bought and sold as though they were livestock or tools. "Chattels". Things, not fellow humans.  Some slaves could buy their freedom. A gladiator could become a freedman by the number of kills or contests he won, or by surviving as a champion until he was no longer in condition.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    What's the matter?  Too put-upon to look that up yourself?  Free computer - free internet . . . oh, I get it - you want someone to look it up for you then shove through your thick scull.  Damn snowflakes do your own homework ya lazy dimturds.

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