Evolutionists:  how does evolution explain the prominent chins on most humans?

No other animals have protruding chins.  It seems to serve no purpose, so how or where does it evolve.

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  • 1 month ago

    Elephants also have protruding chins.

    @ thumbs-downers:  Look it up.

  • 1 month ago

    It is the configuration and ability of the teeth in the jaws associated with those chins that tell the story.  We have a really wide range of food capabilities for survival.

    It also relates to the ability to speak, because speech became a way to unify people to work together.  In numbers, there is strength.

  • Cowboy
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Many science illiterates have piled on the anti-science bandwagon by jumping on any criticism of evolution in the entire scientific literature. Yet that is the method of science and that literature is always growing so what might have been an issue 100 years ago and still available in print is now no longer (unless, of course if you don't keep up with that literature and yet continuously harp on dead subjects that have been listed in many an antiscience publication. So many that consumers of such literature often end up foolish - but science illiterates can't see that....

    http://www.pitt.edu/~jhs/articles/human_chin_revis...

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Don't know but I do know Neanderthals didn't have chins. That's the most obvious difference in our skulls (besides theirs being thicker/heavier/bigger). Homo sapiens have very pointy chins, also women have pointer chins than men. The testosterone lessens the angle so male chins look more square. Now that I'm thinking of it I wonder if it's the result of low testosterone. Humans (males) have by comparison low testosterone compared to apes.

    edit: Yeah I think it's also related to our jaws shrinking, the change in diet from hunting&gathering to agriculture, the occipital bun/brow ridge shrinking (Neanderthals had huge ones), and our heads in general being smaller.

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  • 1 month ago

    You seem to have an irrational obsession with a non-existent group called "evolutionists".  Just keep praying that you gain some rationality.

  • 1 month ago

    We don't know.  It's not for chewing, not for talking, and it's not for attracting a mate.  It might be a holdover from the shrinking of our jaws.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spandrel_(biology)

  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Theres numerous species with features that dont serve a purpose, other than to attract a mate

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