What does the question "what does?" refer to in this context?

Right at the end of the following quote, I can't really tell what exactly the question "what does?" refers to. I've been trying to connect it to something that was said previously, but can't make sense of it, so I need a little help.

"This kind of impalement is what Zeresh []Haman's wife] suggested, but in Esther 5:14, the “pole” was prescribed to be 75 feet! Ironically, those who demanded this disgrace for their enemy rarely failed to have been disgraced by them first. Both Haman and Xerxes were perceived to have been made a laughingstock by those whose heads they sought to display.

Interesting, isn’t it? But what does this peculiar piece of antiquity have to do with you and me? Thankfully, impaling somebody’s head on a stick is not exactly the solution that comes to us when someone in our family asks how to deal with an offense. The question is: What does?"

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  • 6 months ago
    Favourite answer

    First the author asks the question

    "But what does this peculiar piece of antiquity have to do with you and me?"

    Next, he gives a partial answer to this question by saying that impaling a head is not something that has "to do with you and me."

    So then he repeats his original question:

    What does this story have to do with us?

    Not "impaling heads" -- so "What does it have to do with us?"

    "What does?" means "If not impaling heads, then WHAT exactly DOES this story have to do with me and you?"

  • ?
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    It refers, as is often the case, to what came immediately before. "Thankfully, impaling somebody’s head on a stick is not exactly the solution that comes to us when someone in our family asks how to deal with an offense."

    So, "What does come to us when someone in our family asks how to deal with an offense?"

  • RP
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    After reading the text, I'd interpret "what does" to mean "how" or "in what way."

  • 6 months ago

    The author ought to have said "What is?" because he is talking about a solution to the offense.  What does solve, is the idea that was intended, but there is no action of solving that is declared, only the existence of a solution, so it is a question of existence (What is the solution) rather than one of action (What does solve).

    That is, the statement is not "(impaling) does not solve...", it was "(impaling) is not the solution..."

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  • 6 months ago

    There are two possible answers.

    1. It is restating "what does this peculiar piece of antiquity have to do with you and me?"

    2. "comes to us when someone in our family asks how to deal with an offense." "What does?" means - What does come to us?

    Either could be correct and the next paragraph may tell you.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    It is referring to the previous paragraph - ie what does this story have to do with us?

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