joe
Lv 4
joe asked in Society & CultureRoyalty · 2 months ago

could a direct descendant of the previous royal family challenge the prince for the crown?

there are centuries of lineages of royalty that are not of the same family and for hundreds of years the English Royal Court spoke French. if there was a living member of the most recent previous royal family challenge the prince for the crown?

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    No. A law of 1701, and still in force,  says the monarch has to be a (non catholic) descendant of the Electress Sophia of Hanover. Any claimants would almost certainly fail that test immediately. But 'previous family' doesn't make a lot of sense. The present Queen is of the same family as (and a direct descendant of) Alfred the Great, despite myriad changes of dynasty through marriage, deposition or conquest. As Lady Jane Grey found to her cost, you mess with the succession at your peril.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    No anyone before Victoria has left it too late

  • jimmy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No. Prince Charles is the next in line for the Crown. No one can challenge that.

  • Clo
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No. By Parliamentary and constitutional laws, the monarch must be the Protestant descendant of the Stuart family scion, Sophia of Hanover, daughter of Elizabeth Stuart, eldest daughter of James VI and I, King of Scotland, England, and Ireland.

    Several of today's British royals speak fluent French.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    by Royal Decree, it would need to be settled by a Royal b*tch slapping contest. 

    Loser is beheaded. 

  • Rico
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    Some have tried in the past and succeeded, while other who tried failed miserably 

    Henry Tudor succeeded in 1485. The then married the heir presumptive to the previous reigning house, making his successor the heir apparent to both the House of York and House of Lancaster. 

    The Jacobites tried and failed in 1689, 1715 and 1719. 

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Since 1701, the succession to the British Crown has been clearly defined and there's no scope for challenge

  • 2 months ago

    Since 1701, the succession to the British Crown has been clearly defined and there's no scope for challenge.  However, there are a few earlier occasions when monarchs have succeeded in dubious circumstances.  

    King James II of England (VII of Scotland) was deposed because parliament didn't like his religion.  Parliament replaced him with a Dutchman. There were a number of Stuart pretenders to the throne.  However, if James II had not been deposed, George III would still have come to the throne although with a different regnal number.

    During the War of the Roses, various wings of the Plantagenet family kept murdering each other and claiming the Crown.  This ended when Henry Tudor seized the throne.  His claim was spurious although he married Elizabeth of York who had a better claim to the throne than he did.  It could be argued that all monarchs from Henry VII onwards are illegitimate and that the Plantagenets should return to the throne.  The senior survivor of the Plantagenet line is Simon Abney-Hastings, Earl of Loudoun, but as an Australian republican, he's unlikely to challenge the present incumbent.

    That then takes us back to the Norman conquest when we were taken over by a load of French speaking Norwegians.  We might be a bit hard-pressed to reverse that and expel anyone over 5ft 6in tall.  Before that these islands were Celtic but were taken over by various Germanic and Scandinavian tribes who became the English and Lowland Scots.  Before the Celts were the beaker folk - a red-haired dark-skinned people who were experts in smelting bronze and precious metals.  We don't know much about them because they left no writing but they may account for the legend of the leprechauns.  If there's a swarthy redhead out there who wants to claim the British Crown, I'd be glad to head up their legal team.

  • 2 months ago

    Yes, it's possible.

    Tradition would dictate that they have to wrestle naked in a large pool of jelly.

    The event would no doubt be televised.

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