why don't piston rings in an engine wear out faster when they are constantly rubbing against the cylinder wall all the time? ?

7 Answers

Relevance
  • CB
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    They run up and down on a thin film of oil, never really touch the cylinder walls. I opened a 1981 Celica with 130k miles once and you could still see the machine marks  on the cylinder walls.

  • F
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    Ever wondered why you have engine oil?

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Actually a good question but really, why don't cylinder walls wear out more quickly? The rings are very hard steel or chrome and the cylinder walls are relatively soft cast iron, or rarely, silicon treated aluminum. The cast iron cylinder walls are self lubricating as they hold a thin layer of oil in their pores as the rings glide over them. The cylinder bores are often splash lubed by the crankshaft as the small ends dip and throw oil as they rotate. Also, engines have oil squirting jets in the connecting rods, fed by the crankshaft oil gallery that spray the cylinder walls.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    That is the job for the engine oil.  That is why they always tell you to check the oil level. 

  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • 2 months ago

    Because they're lubricated with engine oil and that minimises metal to metal contact. Also, they are made of the right alloy for the job so they don't quickly wear out. After a long time, they can wear out.

  • Rick
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    they are constantly oiled and VERY HARD !!!

  • 2 months ago

    Doesn’t it get a lot of lubrication to reduce friction. 

Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.