Can you be put under anesthesia on a trip to the moon? ?

Since you can experience strong g force, and have to train your body to make it out of the atmosphere, couldn’t you just be put under until you land on the moon to eliminate those complications if you were taking a paid-for commercial trip to the moon? 

Update:

I was simply wondering due to a lot of individuals wanting to travel to other celestial bodies without undergoing strenuous training. Most people who would voluntarily go to the moon would Most likely be people who only want to visit the surface of the moon and come straight home. 

24 Answers

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  • 2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    Being asleep won't prevent the injuries to your body that might occur if your acceleration is too great. You might wake up with broken bones or internal injuries. You might wake up dead. 

  • Jack
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    if someone would allow me to do this I wouldn't trust them

  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    18 answers, and almost none of them address the elephant in the room..

    Anasthaesia does NOT mitigate the effects of G-forces one bit

  • Manuel
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    Bad idea, you need to be awake in case of emergencies. Also, if the "G" forces were to be so high as to cause possible injury there wouldn't be civilian passengers. Be safe.

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  • Acetek
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    Why?   It is only a 3 day trip.   Half the fun is watching everything from lift off to landing

  • Tom
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    WHY?   And then you miss the TRIP, it is why you go to the moon to begin with.  Like knocking yourself out before going on the Ferris Wheel ride----Why even bother?

  • 2 months ago

    sedation requires constant attention by a nurse at a minimum. And sedation with zero gravity is a big unknown, you may choke. 

  • 2 months ago

    Yes but I would prefer a Reefer

  • 2 months ago

    Well, you probably could - but, in the event of an abort, they're going to want you to be alert & conscious... 

  • Jim
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Astronauts normally experience a maximum g-force of around 3gs during a rocket launch. This is equivalent to three times the force of gravity humans are normally exposed to when on Earth but is survivable for the passengers.

    3 g's is ok for a couple of minutes, much better than anesthesia imo.

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