Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Home & GardenMaintenance & Repairs · 4 weeks ago

Ceiling Fans running for weeks at a time? Dangerous?

I live in a log cabin home with a loft and no Air Conditioning, just two ceiling fans that are pretty high up.

I also have a dog.

My mother is ALWAYS telling me not to run the fans all the time, because the fan motors might burn out and burn the house down. Is this possible?

With the virus, I'm working from home. The fans run on high because it feels nice and keep me and the dog cool. At night, the dog sleeps in his bed in the living room, so I just leave the fan going for him because he is panting without it.

Is the ceiling fans running on high speed for weeks at a time going to burn everything down? Or is my mom just worried too much?

Thanks.

13 Answers

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  • elhigh
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago
    Favourite answer

    In my old house I had a ceiling fan that ran for every minute of the 11 years we lived there, except for when the power went out.

    Every. Minute.

    Dangerous?  No.

    I'm a pro handyman and have never ever encountered a ceiling fan that got so hot it burned.  I've seen a couple that "burned out" but the overheating was contained inside the motor casing.  I'm not saying it can't happen, but you're at way greater risk from burning your house down from something a lot more mundane, like the stove.

  • 4 weeks ago

    When an electric motor "burns down" it doesn't literally burns, it's all metal, it just means that at some place the electrical connection/copper coil was damaged and it will not produce the magnetic field required to rotate, or the transformer went bad.

    No risk of fire there. Electrical fires start from overheating wires (when for some reason it's pulling more than the cable can supply and the cable becomes a heating element) or sparks that are not contained within an insulated enclosure (junction box, metal casing for the fan, etc.).

    I wouldn't worry, at some point it will fail like everything else and that depends on the quality of the fan. My parent's ceiling fan has been running since 1987 pretty much 24/7.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Mine run all summer long. If the fans are in good shape, there is no reason to worry. If they are very old, if the wiring is suspect, then get them replaced so you no longer have to be concerned. 

  • Robert
    Lv 4
    4 weeks ago

    Safety regulations say there should be a thermal cut-out fuse built into the motor windings. Usually run continuously at intermediate speed because of noise reasons. This can be done because the motor windings are tapped selected by a multiway switch to change the speed settings.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    It is not dangerous. The fan will just be broken one day...

  • 4 weeks ago

    I turned mine on in 2015. So far, it seems OK.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Mine gets turned on in the spring and off in the late fall.  I run it on low speed.  The fan has been there for 30 years doing that with no issues.  Those motors are built to run continuously  

  • Droopy
    Lv 5
    4 weeks ago

    She's a  nervous nellie.  Even if the motor went bad its not gonna burn down the house.  I mean nothing is impossible but it would take extremely odd conditions  for it to burn a house  down.   What burn on a motor are the  windings. which are inside the motor housing which is metal. An odds are when that happens its gonna trip the breaker.  An to add to that of 44 years of life an ceiling fans being everywhere. I don't know of 1 that burnt the windings.  Few that the bearing/bushings went bad in.

    Source(s): Hvac tech
  • 4 weeks ago

    as long as properly wired up -- not dangerous

  • 4 weeks ago

    Yeah it's possible by not very likely. running a fan generates heat, the only benefit is if someone is there to experience evaporative cooling from sweat evaporating. Dogs do not sweat, not sure what benefit your getting unless it's moving cool night air into your home 

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