Red asked in Science & MathematicsZoology · 1 month ago

Would you?

Would you purposely let a insect that has a really painful sting sting you the reason I ask is bc I've always been fascinated by insects and animals and have watched videos of people testing the stings of certain insects and wondered if some really hurt that bad and have considered learning about the ones that do and maybe even attempting to test some of them myself of course only in the right conditions.

4 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    Of course not. I do not want no disease to be transmitted by the bite. I got stung on the palm once by a honey bee that I smacked and I was stupid enough to put it on my palm. It was almost as painful as anything I have ever experienced. I was also stung by many hornets after I lifted a log on the ground looking for snakes, and the hornets poured out of a hole on the ground. Got stung on the top of my head. Although it was not as painful as a bee stung, it did not stop hurting until a few hours later. I would not want to experience the same again, ever.

  • Kenny
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    I have a condition that causes me pain and one night I got stung on the foot by a scorpion .  The sting hurt but it seemed to relieve the other pain so I didn't treat the scorpion sting with an extractor .  Someone later told me that the sting probably released endorphins that dulled the condition pain also .  So, getting stung could have some benefits unless anaphylactic shock occurs . 

  • 1 month ago

    If I knew it wouldn't kill me, and I was in a controlled environment, then maybe. I personally don't know if I'd do it without some kind of coercion or compensation but I can see the upsides.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I would have to be paid an amount of money proportional to the amount of pain, i.e. putting out a match with my fingers = all in a day's work, but writhing on the ground in agony = paying off my mortgage.

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