Ali asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 month ago

What does the title "lord lieutenant general of England" mean exactly?

"... lord lieutenant general of England, and the queen’s [Elizabeth I] new favourite, the dashing thirty‑ year‑ old Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex." 

6 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    Not a lot. Essex was Master-General of the Ordnance ( a military position)  AND Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. 

  • 1 month ago

    Does not mean anything no such title.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Possessor of the Proudest Cod-Piece is a bit too flashy, even for dashing thirty-year-olds.

  • 1 month ago

    Actually, it doesn't really mean anything at all. It's from a government form that was given out to people to complete if they wanted to apply for the position of "Queen's Favourite" in the olden days. You had to score out the bits of that phrase that didn't apply to you........ lord, lieutenant, general and, of course, you had to score out the "England" part if you weren't from England and replace it with your own country (say, "China"). Hope this helped.

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    BBC bite size is an education gateway that explains this to 14-15 yr olds for their history GCSEs ( basic school examinations) https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/z88fk7h/revi...

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You want this link:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord-lieutenant#Engl...

    The "general" bit means top man of that rank.

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