Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationBuying & Selling · 1 month ago

Did the dealer rip me off with this so called "restoral" fee, is it a total scam?

After we got ready to sign the papers on buying a used car, we noticed they tacked on a $899 bill for "restoral" is what they called it.

I had stepped away whenever they explained it to my father (I am the buyer), and they didn't point out the price to him. Whenever I come back, I see him pouring some liquid onto a piece of paper. He then quickly threw it away and changed the subject.

Later we point out the huge charge, and the finance officer says "well, you signed this paper with it". Like we should know that the charge was there. So we go ask the sales guy, he doesn't really give any explanation for why it's so much money. He claims it comes standard on all of their used cars and isn't even an option, and tries to reassure us that it's worth it to keep the car stain free inside and protect the paint outside for at least 3 years.

Sounded like snake oil crap to me, but the problem was I really wanted the car, and didn't want to walk away, so I accepted it. Luckily for me I traded them a 7 year old car that I knew trans was hours from failing completely, I barely made it there. At least I got it to stop say "transmission failure" on the dash.

I figured they'd try to screw me, and "restoral" sounds like a dumb scam to me where they just pocket $900 for nothing, so I hope they enjoy that totally worthless trade I gave them. They'll probably spend more than that getting another trans in that car.

10 Answers

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  • So you knew about the sketchy fee but still signed? 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    When you smell smoke a fire is nearby.  This was a scam.  Restoral fee was the cost of the car.  Any other claim is noise they can stick up their butt hole.

    As for screwing them with a junk car...they gave you few dollars as a trade in - they in turn put $1000 MORE onto the price and hang on a balloon or 2 and sell it to some one else.  They may have added half a quart of transmission fluid to it and it is fixed.  Considering auto transmissions go for 30 years. they spent nothing  and MADE MONEY FROM BOTH ENDS.   From you because of the $900 Turtle Wax charge and an additional $1500 that they had put on top of the car you wanted (so they made 2500 out of you and an additional 1K minimum out of your car as they sell it to someone else without doing a damn thing except the TURTLE WAX SCAM they are doing.  Unless the next guy does not fall for the wax scam, they still make $1K+ off of your car.

    YOU CAN GLOAT ALL YOU WANT, but all I see is more and more car lots going up all the time.

    "I see him pouring some liquid onto a piece of paper. He then quickly threw it away and changed the subject."WHY YOU INCLUDED THIS DISTRACTION, I DO NOT KNOW."

    You did not hang around for the whole negotiation process.  So you got NOTHING TO SAY.  There is NOTHING YOU CAN DO NOW, THE PAPERS ARE SIGNED. END OF STORY.

  • 1 month ago

    Dealerships charge differing amounts for taking in a trade-in car or used car and "restoring" it to drivable, saleable goods. That will mean, usually, new fluids, brake adjustments, lube job, radiator flush and fill, thorough detail cleaning, and maybe paint touchup. Your fee was a bit much, but maybe the car needed some extra work. All you have to do when you see fees on a contract is ask for the explanation of what those fees actually MEAN--and what they cover. If you don't want to pay them, or if you think they're unfair, ask for a discount. POLITELY.  "Can this fee be waived or discounted?" Is all you have to say. 

    It's okay to negotiate fees and unexplained charges at any time on any contract. But you have to speak up. And never allow a dealer to explain these things to anyone who is not an actual buyer. YOU need to be the one who asks, gets the explanation and the information. Otherwise, they can slip all sorts of things in there you don't understand or agree to. ALWAYS stick right there and start asking questions based on what you are required to sign--and don't SIGN until you are satisfied with the explanations. The dealership is working for YOU, not a third party that is there with you--and you are responsible for the purchase. 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    That kind of thing is common on new car. Never heard of it on used. Next time pay more attention. Similar to "doc fee".

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Complain to your state attorney general.  There is likely a consumer protection division.  They will investigate. 

    Next time you are asked to sign a contract, get the papers and walk out of wherever you are, and go alone to a quiet place, andcread every word.  Don't bring your father.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You were scammed.  Without paying a lawyer, I would report/complain to the authority in your area.  In my state, it would be the Department of Consumer Affairs under the Secretary of State  (could be different where you live).  They may not be able to change the deal, but they'll start a file on the dealer and collect complaints from others - and make life miserable for the dealer who they'll drive crazy with forms, applications, letters, calls.  If your local television/radio station has an investigative reporter, I'd contact them as well.  Better Business Bureaus are essentially useless:  they have no authority to do anything and are supported by the businesses they supposedly monitor.

  • 1 month ago

    You got hosed. You have to pay close attention at the signing to all the items they try to pad the bill with. The finish protectants/scotch guarding and the "extended" warranties are the favorite optional items. Put your foot down and say No Thanks... they cannot legally make you take them.

  • 1 month ago

    You were scammed.  Used car dealers are specialists at tricking people into buying cars.  You could fight it, but it would be a monumental aggravation.  Good luck on your next purchase.

  • 1 month ago

    You signed, you're done. 

    Don't worry about it at this point and enjoy your vehicle. Is it worth the $899? Never. 

    But, next time you'll know. 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Bill of sale should say the total and final amount you must pay.  If there are tacked on "fees" later, you walk.

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