how do you fix an open ground on a three prong plug when there is no ground wire in the wire feeding the wall plug??

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  • 1 month ago

    You have two choices: either run an equipment grounding conductor from your outlet all the way back to the main panel and ground it there (the best preferred method). Or, for safety, replace the outlet with a GFCI outlet. A GFCI outlet will work just fine without a ground connection and provide shock protection to make up for there  being no ground wire. However, you should put a sticker on the three prong GFCI outlet that says, "No equipment ground". These stickers (more than one) come with the GFCi outlet.

    If you have other outlets on the same circuit, you can place the GFCI at the start of the string of outlets and then all of the outlets "downstream" will also be protected in the same manner. Then you can use the 3 prong outlets so long as you have two stickers on each outlet, one that says  "No equipment ground" and the other that says " GFCI protected". These stickers come with the outlet.

    This procedure is legal according to the National Electrical Code and most likely is legal with your local codes - but check anyway to be sure it's legal in your area.

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  • 1 month ago

    You could ground the wire itself or use a cheat which most of the time works but if you do don't run a device that requires lots of power or you might short out your device or even start a fire but for low voltage devices it is usually safe. 

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  • Kate
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Get an Electrician. It is very dangerous for someone with no knowledge to do this.

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  • 1 month ago

    Are you talking about the wire from the appliance, gadget or whatever it is to the plug?  If it's something like a light it usually doesn't need a ground as they are double insulated.  That's why there isn't one.

    • M.
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      He's using improper terminology.  That's why what he is saying doesn't make sense.

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  • 1 month ago

    you don't because that light does not need a earth 

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  • 1 month ago

    IF the wiring is in metal conduit, the conduit may be grounded. If that is the case, connecting the ground wire to the conduit will ground the outlet.

    If not, the only way to create a ground is to run a grounded wire back to the panel.

    • JoKyoNim
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      You do realize the 1 way you describe is actually bonding not ground. And who knows it the conduit is properly connected and so bonded.  I can not say how many loose connectors and couplings i have ran across. Let alone romex or bx. Best just to pull new ground

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  • 1 month ago

    The fact is that some older homes do not have grounds in the outlets. That came later. Millions of home did not, and still do not have grounds in the outlets. So its up to you to use it as is or not.

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  • Rick
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Run a separate green ground wire ...................................

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  • 1 month ago

    maybe depends on construction methods.  Example: one house i looked into, built in the 1950s, had metal conduit for the electrical everywhere with what looked like THHN wires inside it.  turned out the conduit was grounded [multimeter test hot to conduit and found 110v potential].  i looked further and found that the conduit was continuous back to the old breaker box and it, too, was grounded.  Otherwise, you need to run a separate ground wire from a known ground, such as the breaker box.

    Hint: a GFCI outlet will actually work if you wire the green ground to the neutral.  It isn't as safe and the guarantee/warranty is void ... but it'll work.  this because, in the breaker box all the ground wires [green or bare] and all the neutral wires [white] are wired together into the grounding block.

    Source(s): grampa
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  • A.J.
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You have old wiring in only two wires. That outlet should only be a two prong.

    https://inspectapedia.com/electric/Electrical_Outl...

    You can discuss it with an electrician if you own the home.

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