Should a used car title always have the owner's name on it?

This is a dumb question, but I am trying to buy a used car from someone, however... the title is not in his name ... he said it was a car he bought for his son but he sent me a picture of the title and it clearly says "Carvanna LLC" under the owner category..

I don't understand this concept about car titles and cannot find any explanations on the internet.  I looked up the cars history and the last owner was a car dealership (im guessing carvanna? )  

could this guy be a dealer for carvanna?  if hes a dealer and doesn't own the title, does that mean the story he told me about purchasing the car for his son was balogne? 

Update:

could he still be making payments on the vehicle? would i have to call Carvanna to figure this out?

9 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Be careful,do not buy a car with a title that has someone else's name on it.

    PS: If you need the seat covers check out copap.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Yes, the title MUST  have the owners name on it unless it is being sold by a licensed car dealer such as Carvana. A licensed dealer can legally reassign a title but a private seller cannot. Even if the car has a loan on it, the owners name will be on the title, but the lienholder will also be shown on the title. In the case of Carvana, they probably bought is at auction and their name may be on the title. 

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  • M.
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Go to your local DMV and talk to them about a motor vehicle title. 

    A privately owned motor vehicle will have a person's name on the title.  They are the owner. 

    A business can own a vehicle, but then more paperwork is required to verify who owns the business. 

    Carvanna is obviously not a person.

    So go to their address and ask them.

    Do not give anybody any money who can not give you a lawfully signed car title.

    Further, you need to compare the VIN on the title to the VIN on the car. 

    I'd bring the person with the title to the DMV and present the title there.  The DMV will transfer the title for you.  When it's done, hand the person the money.

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  • Niko
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    Yes. Titles are proof of ownership. If the seller's name is not on it, then he/she does not legally own it.

    Ask if you can see and inspect the car in person. If he refuses or is unable to meet with you, then it's a scam. Many of these scammers are located overseas out of reach of law enforcement. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Never buy a car with a title that has someone else's name on it, regardless of the explanation. 

     

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You mean the front in printed form or the back in written?

    I live in one state and Im afraid I don't know the laws of the other 49 either.

    If he was making payments to carvana the title would be in his name. And he would not have a copy of it.

    Carvana should not be on the front even if they owned it.  They would be on the back. 

    And the prior owner would have signed it over to them.

    i was a dealer for 12 years and my company name NEVER went on the front of a title. And if I sold it, the customer only got the title direct from me is if they were an out of state buyer. But the buyers name would be written in on the back below my company name.

    What is the value of the car? Did Carvana wholesale it to this guy?

    They sell nice low mile cars themselves. They would wholesale any old high mileage units.

    Do an internet search of the vin and see if anything comes up.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    If you are buying a used car, the seller name on the driver's license and the name on the title should be the same letter for letter.  If it is not, walk.  Make that run.

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  • A.J.
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Probably Carvana, LLC, which seems to be an online used car dealership. No physical business. The story behind the car is irrelevant. If interested you should get a vehicle history report such as CARFAX. There are free online services. About buying it, if not a physical car lot, I would only transfer at a motor vehicle department to assure they accept the paperwork for transfer of ownership. Only the owner or official representative of Carvana, LLC can release the title. If you have the title you look for liens listed on it, but only the motor vehicle department has current records. If they are closed that is a problem. 

    The question is, if you are unable to transfer ownership and register the car, who can you go to to return the car and get your money back? 

    If making payments, it is a lien listed on the current title, but that title could be old. 

    Does he have a state issued ID with his verified address and even a business card? 

    I'm always cautious about virtual and technology that younger people live on. 

    I looked at the web site, and it would take a lot to convince me to buy a car through them.   

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Run. He's a liar. It's a gimmick, a scam. He's one of those people that buys cars for less than they're worth, quickly does stuff to them to make them appear to be worth far more (like rolling back the odometer, covering up rust with trim or tape, etc.), and then deceptively resells them for far more than they are worth. They are able to commit fraud without getting caught because they never put the car in their own name. Invariably, the name they give you is fake, as is the convoluted story they've come up with for why their name doesn't appear on the title. What they do is they buy the car, but instead of transferring the title over into their names, they resell it before the time period is up that they have to put it in their names, even often extending that time period indefinitely by convincing the seller to not date the title with the sales date so that they can then date it when someone's about to buy it and make it all look kosher, so their names, these scammers' names, are never on the car or on any document and you have no idea who they actually are. They then just disappear and you are stuck with a hunk of junk you've paid way too much money for. When you try to take action, you get referred back to the prior owner who says, "Yeah, I sold that car for $500 10 months ago because it has a bad engine to a guy who was strapped for cash and asked that I not date the title because he needed some extra time to come up with the registration money," and you're all, "But I bought it last week for $5,000 and he promised me nothing was wrong with it."

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