In music, if you're playing various instruments in a piece of music, do you all play the different notes of the same chord?

I'm struggling to find a way top explain what I mean.  I'm learning piano, should I play the same chords with both hands... OR the notes that make up the same chord?  So, if a piece goes C, G, F, Am and I want 5 instruments in the piece... Do we all play C together, FOR EXAMPLE: some playing one note of that chord, another playing another note, one playing an octave higher, another playing 2 notes on the bass, then move to G together... does that make any sense?  You cant play C chord and G chord together can you?  

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  • Usually each instrument has notes in an individual cleft that are to be played. Each instrument plays their part, whether it is a band or orchestra, not every part.

    On the other hand, pianos can usually play every part, but still have their own unique parts they play.

    Best regards.

    Source(s): Piano player for 16 years
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  • 1 month ago

    It's called voicing. I suggest you take classes in music theory. Writing music is not something you just pick up on over night. There have been a few pros who composed beautiful compositions but had to engage someone who knew music theory to write the music for them.

    • Mamianka
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

       . . . And some if them paid the ghostwriter ti NEVER TELL . . . Like a Marnie Nixon of arranging, almost. Ferde Grofe for Gershwin . . .

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  • 1 month ago

    I suggest you take some music theory classes, it seems like you're trying to write music, but don't understand how the formation of music works. Having some knowledge of music theory will really help, and I suggest you do some web surfing at the least. 

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  • 1 month ago

    I think I understand what you mean - if you want a certain chord played, the piano can play all the notes - like C E G in a C chord - but those also can can be distributed among the single-note instruments you are using.  In fact, they would be fine with NO piano our guitar, organ, etc. included.  Of course, learning HOW to write those parts in a special skill - this is why people take Theory classes and then move up top instrumentation and orchestration - which does need a whole *orchestra* - orchestration just means how you decide who plays what!  This take a while to learn - and then a LONG time to get really good an fluent at it.  Same deal with writing harmony for choruses -

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    • Mamianka
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      I agree with several of the others who said "Take Theory classes" - because I did not want to be pushy - but I *am* a theory teacher.

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  • 1 month ago

    Of course, except for the brass, woodwinds and percussion and you cannot play more than 2 notes at the same time on the viols. For the pianist and guitarist, those can play whole chords of 10 notes and 6 notes respectively.

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