Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Home & GardenGarden & Landscape · 1 month ago

How much land do you need to grow your own fruits and vegetables ?

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  • Mr. P
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Anything is a start and any you do grow will lower your food bills. You don't have to live 100% off the land but it all helps.

    I have learned over the years that you need space to grow food, but not necessarily "land" as such. You can grow a lot of food on a concrete parking lot if you use bags of compost and a watering system. In fact many commercial tomato growers do just that. You can grow vertically in pipes with a slot - it just needs pumped water with nutrients. You can grow in a basement with lighting and hydroponics.Or on windowsills in small propagators and just eat the very small plants.You can get a good yield of potatoes just by putting good soil in grocery bags and planting one potato in each bag.Climbing beans just need nice damp soil at their roots but will climb over anything - shed, washing line, up walls, over bins. 

    If you are going to save money grow what you eat the most of or is the most expensive to buy.

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  • 1 month ago

    This depends on many factors.  

    Soil type and exposure, geographical location, local weather and temperature.  As most fruits come from trees and vines growing your own fruit will take up large amounts of space.  You also get a whole lot at one time during the ripening season, more than one person can use.

    And do you want to grow ALL the stuff you eat or just augment what you can buy?  I have about 1100 sf of garden space and it produces far more than I can eat, but I’m usually only eating dinner at home and sometimes not even that.  I give away most of the produce from my garden because I can barely make a dent in it myself.

    Most people aren’t trying to grow all their own stuff, but some things, like garden tomatoes, usually can’t be purchased at a regular market.  Fresh herbs are also expensive and only good for a couple weeks max if you take good care of them so herbs are a great investment of space if you like to cook with them.

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  • 1 month ago

    I knew a guy that had a tiny little garden probably no bigger than  20' by 20' and yet he always got far more vegetables than his neighbor whose garden took up most of his back yard and was 4 times or so bigger. He used what was called a Japanese bamboo garden but instead of bamboo he used a garden hose with holes in it which you can buy in stores, he got his from Farm King. You till the spot and he tilled in 2 or 3 twenty pound bags of fertilizer. Then bury the hose zigzagging through the garden leaving an end sticking out close enough to attach an extension hose to the outside faucet. He then put black plastic (which could be replaced by some organic mulch) over the plot and used wire hoops to pin it down to the ground so the wind would not life it. He then made cross shaped slits in the plastic and planted plants like for any crop he wanted tomato plants to little bean plants or pea plants or cukes whatever you want to plant. He built up trellises of wood for the plants to climb up and whenever they needed watering he would hook up the extension and turn the water on for half an hour or 20 minutes. His yield was so great that he let me and other friends pick all we wanted and he still got more than he could use but of course you could do some home canning which I did for years when I had my gardens. 

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  • 1 month ago

    I've heard approx. 1100 square feet per person for regular planting. If you do mixed planting, you might be able to do with less space. This is for being 100% self-supplying all year round in a temperate climate (meaning you will also be planting crop that can be store throughout most of the winter), and not including any fruit trees or bushes.

    We've done the above in the past, and while I haven't measured the size of my beds and greenhouse, I would say the 1100 square feet is probably not that far off. These days I plant just for the fun of it, though and whatever I have the time for, because it is time consuming in spring.

    It of course also depends on what you plant. Some plants give a high yield per square foot, others less.

    If you just want to grow a bit for the fun of it, then many things can be grown in pots. It's not like you need several acres before you can plant anything.

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  • 1 month ago

    You can grow them on a small balcony, provided you have the right pots and enough sunlight. Tomatoes, peppers, herbs, cucumbers, beans, carrots and even potatoes can ALL be grown in pots. But you have to remember a few guidelines.  ONE plant per pot, not a 'crop' of them for larger veggies, such as tomatoes and peppers. The pot needs to have good drainage, no standing water after rain or watering. The pot needs to be DEEP--a tomato plant needs about a foot of dirt under it. Ditto for peppers. Bush cucumbers can be grown in a 5-gallon bucket. Potatoes can be grown in a burlap sack filled with peat moss, leaves and loose dirt. 

    In other words, you don't need much land at all. Raised beds are another way to do it. The bed doesn't have to be large, just deep enough. You can get the kind that look like a big planter, on legs, if land is at a premium or space is limited. 

    There's also another way to grow huge amounts of vegetables in small spaces: they are called Earthtainers. Here's a link to info. There are links in the article to get the plans on line for free. https://slate.com/technology/2011/04/earthtainer-h...

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  • kswck2
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Growing that depends more on what kind of wildlife you have in the area. Fruits and veggies can be grown in a relatively small area.

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  • elhigh
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    A single 6" pot will grow a single healthy strawberry plant.  Mind you, you will need to be vigilant with water levels in a reservoir that small.

    Now that you see that the minimum required to get started growing your own food is really VERY minimal, you see that it doesn't take a lot of land at all to do some more substantial growing.

    How much of your own fruits and veggies do you want to grow?  If you just want to be able to pick greens for a salad once a week, a plot about 5 feet square will do that.  For more people, more land.

    If you want to displace more of your vegetable shopping with garden-grown, obviously your space requirements go up - and don't forget that when all that comes in at harvest, you need lots of storage space to keep it in as well, either in the freezer or canned in jars, or even dried.  These are not trivial considerations.

    Some fruits and vegetables may not grow at all where you are: pineapples are a non-starter in Minnesota, for example.  Lettuce likes it cooler than you're likely to find in Florida.  So be realistic with your expectations.

    What it comes down to is, this is actually a math question.  Figure out how many plants you need to meet your needs, multiply that by how many square feet per plant, multiply that by how many people in your household, and there you are.  But YOU already have those data in hand, and we do not.  So it's really up to you to work out how much space it's going to take, and whether your goals can be met in the space you have available.

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  • 1 month ago

    Are you looking to grow enough to supply 100% of your yearly fruits and veggies, or just enough to help out a little in the summer?  To grow enough for all year, you'll probably need several acres. (Hint: in my hippy days, I had a book called "5 Acres and Independence")

    If you just want to supplement your groceries with home grown fruit and veggies, then there's something for everybody.  There are some fruits, even small trees,  that can be grown in containers on your deck. I own 10 acres, but most of it is field and swamp.  My home, lawn and garden are all on less than 2 acres. I have 17 blueberry bushes, 3 apple trees (and a few wild ones), a plum tree, 2 pears that I just planted this year, a blackberry patch, rhubarb patch, grape arbor, and a vegetable garden that's about 20 x 20 feet. Oh, and in the spring, I tap some maple trees and make maple syrup. All that, and it still takes an hour to mow the lawn on a rider. All that on under 2 acres, with room to spare. The actual garden space could probably fit on a half acre.

    So how much space do you need? Anywhere from a large deck, to several acres, depending on how much work you want to do.

    • elhigh
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      I loved Five Acres.  Still have a copy.

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  • 1 month ago

    Most fruit grows on trees, so you need space for whichever fruit tree you select to reach a mature size.  Some fruit grows on bushes (blueberries/raspberries), in order to get sufficient harvest you will need several bushes of each desired variety.

    For vegetables the size of the area will also depend on which vegetables.  Some plants spread out, like melons and squash.  Some vegetables don't take much room like beans and tomatoes.  I'd say 200 sq feet is sufficient to grow a vegetable garden with a lot of variety.  Just be sure it gets full sun.

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  • Scott
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    For the typical family, the area about the size of a common bathroom is sufficient. The issue is that you tend to get all the produce around the same time.  Imagine in a typical week, getting more squash, zucchini, and tomatoes that you can possibly eat by yourself. You end up having to give it away.

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