Can a bullet with MORE stopping power still penetrate LESS than bullets with LESS stopping power.?

So I know a .308 winchester has more stopping power than a .223 remington.

But does that mean it penetrates MORE?  Just because a .308 winchester is more powerful, does that make it penetrate deeper?

Stopping power and ability to penetrate are a not exactly the same thing.

14 Answers

Relevance
  • Mr.357
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Stopping power is a function of energy dump and hole size.  If a bullet goes all the way through, it does not dump all of its energy.  I have had a bullet go all the way through a coyote from head to tail with a FMJ .223 Remington.  My son once shot a coyote with a .308 NBT Custom Competition bullet.  It was from head to tail.  The bullet did not exit.  I would guess the bullet disintegrated as there was no exit hole and when you picked up the coyote it sounded all slushy inside.  We did not skin it.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    Penetration and stopping power don't combine in any math.

    A .308 has far more energy than the much lighter .223.

    Penetration depends on the bullet expansion.

    My .380 will likely go through a human torso, my .45 acp CJHP probably won't.

    That .45 would take a 200 pound man off his feet. The .380, just a nasty hole.

    As for stopping power, either will stop any threat. Thàt is the goal.

    Few are likely to survive the .45.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    "Stopping power" is not a measurable thing and is only used by those that really don't understand terminal ballistics.  Both.308 win and .223 remington do a darn fine job at stopping a human target.  They both have more than enough energy at short ranges to do the job.  At longer ranges the .308 is superior because the .223 falls below 1000 ft⋅lbf of energy first.

    A bullet "stops" a target by destroying or severely damaging critical body systems, such as the pulmonary system, the cardio system, the nervous system, or the skeletal system.  A .308 bullet that passes through the body (over penetrates, wasting energy outside the target) may not do as much damage as a .223 bullet that yaws and fragments internally, converting all of its energy into tissue damage that is likely to affect one of those system.

    A secondary product of a bullet is the pain and fear that it might cause if there is not enough tissue damage to stop them.  Most people would be equally motivated to stop no matter what kind of bullet they are shot with.

    Penetration depends on many things, including the bullet caliber, the construction of the bullet, the material being penetrated, the weight of the bullet and energy (or velocity) of the bullet.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    Over penetration and under penetration are both undesirable. The amount of penetration depends on a lot of factors including velocity and bullet design, but the goal in hunting or self defense is to penetrate deeply enough to disrupt organs and transfer all of the bullet's energy into the target for a quick stop.

    I know another blog that is very helpful

    I think you should visit this sports blog site. It will be Profitable for you.

    Link: https://mtpolice.org/

    안전놀이터 / Safety playground

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • 1 month ago

    In 308 we have over 200 choices of bullets.  From solid lead cast to solid brass.  From hollow points to full metal jacket and military armor piercing.  Lehigh makes them specifically for subsonic use.

    Example:  Sierra 110 hollow point moving at over 3,000 fps - when this hits something it literally explodes into pieces and fragments.  When it hits a coyote, the thing is ripped in half.  Now, if you shot something big, like a bear with it - well - you would just make it mad.  That 110 HP is going to open up while hitting the hair and hide, open wide in the fat layer but probably not make it much past that fat layer.  No penetration.

    Example: Nosler Partition.  This bullet has a solid copper wall between the front and the rear.  As the nose of the bullet hits the animal and begins to mushroom it keep penetrating.  If its a big animal the mushroom will drop off and the wall will prevent bullet from fragmenting - that back section will penetrate into the vital organs and break bones...… this is what you need on a bear, moose, or other big game.

    Any bullet can make a hole in paper at 100 yards.  It when you are going long distance or hunting - here you need to size the bullet weight and bullet style to what you are hunting.  Varmints?  Light hollow points.  Don't want to hurt the hide much on a coyote or wolf?  FMJ.  etc etc etc etc.    

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • BBean
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Your question is confusing so I`ll just make a broad statement. A lot of old ammo books have been rewritten because of plastic. Because of plastic a .308 CAN penetrate AND stop with a ballistic tip AND still not be overweight. Having a Spitzer point to cut through the air...plastic tip to penetrate the surface and fill a void...then mushroom like a hollow point. The hydrostatic shock will stop.a deer, elk, or other mammal in its tracks. 

    Comparing a .223 with a .308 is a waste of time. .308 wins..

     Increasing the diameter of a bullet with small % greatly increases the volume by larger %. Example; .22 to .44 (both the same length) is twice the diameter but approximately four times the volume. 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    No. Bullets work on a principle of weight and speed. Whichever combination of weight and speed yields highest ft/lbs at point of impact will give the most penetration UNLESS the bullet was designed to fragment upon impact.

    Speed+weight+ mass retention=greatest penetration.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Baal
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    As you may have heard in the past, E = mc2, or energy equals mass times velocity squared.  For example a heavier bullet with more mass traveling at a lower speed results in lower muzzle energy compared to a lighter bullet traveling at a higher speed resulting in higher muzzle energy.  Penetration depends on the velocity and mass of the projectile and the density of the target.

    A .223/5.56 round with a 63 grain bullet travels at 2795 fps (feet per second) and has  1093 me (muzzle energy in foot pounds of force).  A .243 round has a 107 gr. bullet / 2975 fps / 2103 me.  A .30-06 Springfield has a 250 gr. bullet / 2280 fps / 2886 me.  On the upper end of commercially available cartridges is the .700 Nitro Express with a 1000 gr. bullet / 2000 fps / 8883 me.  It is used to take down big game like Elephants, Rhinos, Cape Buffalo, Hippos, and an occasional Tyrannosaurus Rex.  Refer to the attached chart pages to compare muzzle velocity and muzzle energy for the various rifle cartridges.

    https://aussiehunter.org/shooting/calibres/list-of...

  • 1 month ago

    Rick Wakeman Live in Argentina

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • L.N.
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Over penetration and under penetration are both undesirable. The amount of penetration depends on a lot of factors including velocity and bullet design, but the goal in hunting or self defense is to penetrate deeply enough to disrupt organs and transfer all of the bullet's energy into the target for a quick stop. A shoot-through is just wasted energy.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.