Is Siberia actually connected to Alaska by land?

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  • 1 month ago

    Not any more, but during ice ages and before 6000 years ago there is still a a Bering straight land bridge. It's underwater now. 

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  • Rain
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Alaska is an exclave of the U.S., it borders the Canadian province of British Columbia and territory of Yukon to the east and southeast and has a maritime border with Russia's Chukotka Autonomous Okrug to the west. To the north are the Chukchi and Beaufort seas of the Arctic Ocean, while the Pacific Ocean lies to the south and southwest.

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  • 1 month ago

    NO!!!

    The Bering Strait separates the two.

    The Bering Strait is 51 miles wide at its narrowest point. In the strait are two islands, the Diomede Islands. They are approximately two(2) miles apart. Greater Diomede is part of Siberian Russia, and Little Diomede is part of Alaska, USA. The USA doesn't have the biggest of everything, you know!!!!. The International Date Line is between the two Diomede Islands.

    The Bering Strait received its name from the Russian Czar, who employed a Danish explorer, Bering, a navigator to explore the Arctic regions of Russia/Siberia.

    Alaska was purchased from the Russians by the USA in the mid Nineteenth Century.

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  • Joseph
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    A quick look at the map will show that the answer is NO.

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  • 1 month ago

    Underwater, yes. Beringia is defined today as the land and maritime area bounded on the west by the Lena River in Russia; on the east by the Mackenzie River in Canada; on the north by 72 degrees north latitude in the Chukchi Sea; and on the south by the tip of the Kamchatka Peninsula. Historically, it formed a land bridge that was up to 1,000 kilometres (620 miles) wide at its greatest extent and which covered an area as large as British Columbia and Alberta together, totaling approximately 1,600,000 square kilometres (620,000 square miles). Today, the only land that is visible from the central part of the Bering land bridge are the Diomede Islands, the Pribilof Islands of St. Paul and St. George, St. Lawrence Island, and King Island.

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  • Bill-M
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Siberia and Alaska are separated by the Bearing Straights.

    Look at this Map.  Siberia on the Left, Alaska on the Right.

    The distance across is 54.5 miles

    Attachment image
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  • 1 month ago

    No, the closest points are two miles apart.

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  • 1 month ago

    The land bridge disappeared centuries ago. You could walk/drive across on ice though

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  • 1 month ago

    Not by land, but by ice

    • Zirp
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      in winter, if it gets cold enough

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