Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 1 month ago

Is this 'author' an idiot, if he tries to sue my publishing company for telling other small-scale publishers not to work with him?

My publishing org was recently in contact with the whiny boomer behind this site:

http://jelliclechronicles.org/default.html

He pitched to us a 'series' based off his fanfiction featured therein, and then had an email tantrum for three week when the woman he was in contact with (dealing mostly with sci-fi/fantasy) suggested some tweaks to his work, NOT telling him he HAD to make such changes.

Apparently, even suggesting that:

1. any of the alien characters maybe believes something other than Christianity With The Serial Numbers Filed Off, is verbally abusive blasphemy. You're writing FANTASY, not nonfiction, and the agent didn't call you a Crusades-era mass murderer, just pointed out that by your own worldbuilding, they wouldn't develop a religion that's basically Christianity IN SPACE!

2. He claimed romance was not a huge part of his works, but every few chapters has a sex scene or two. But suggesting that he add some scenes that build up the nonsexual aspect of relationships being featured, he claims, is "feminist oppression" and "rape." Apparently, suggestions=we are illegally stealing and re-writing his works!

3. Suggesting that he speaks with actual Wiccans/neo-pagans in real life, to get a better feel for similar belief systems, is "feminism trying to corrupt him." JFC, if just talking to someone who's not Christian is enough to corrupt you, you're in the wrong field of writing!

So can he sue us for warning other publishers not to deal with his diva backside?

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Let him sue you. He won't win a lawsuit if the information you shared was factual. Agents and publishers share information about troublesome authors, authors who seem mentally ill, and others who would prove difficult to work with as part of professional hobnobbing, just like record labels share tales of musicians who trash their hotel rooms.

    As a publisher, I would hope you have a legal representative you can call to confirm that he doesn't have a case rather than relying on people who mean well but are not attorneys specializing in defamation litigation.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You sound awfully juvenile. Are you sure you publish books?

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I wasn't sure, so I emailed the author from the link you posted and asked him directly.

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  • Tina
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Why is your publishing organisation even bothering to make suggestions (presumably because you were considering publication) when the original author and creator of the Jellicle cats has only been dead for some fifty five years, and Lloyd Webber probably has them tied up from now to infinity?

    Something odd here.

    • 1 month agoReport

      The material he was pitching for publication was the stuff under "Beyond the Chronicles," which was originally fanfiction so unlike the source material (the musical, T.S. Eliot's poems, "The Jellicle Tribe," itself originally by another author) that changing a few names avoids most copyright issues.

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  • 1 month ago

    If this is a real issue, I can't imagine why you aren't consulting a lawyer who specialises in publishing, rather than ranting all over Y!A to a group of random internet strangers.

    Posting all this insulting stuff about the author on here might rebound on you badly, if the author sees it and feels he could be identified from what you've written.

    My advice (strictly non-legal, non-professional but 100% common sense) is to take a low profile, cease posting defamatory material about the author, and speak to a lawyer.

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  • 1 month ago

    You are free to dismiss his work for your own use but you can't damage him in the eyes of others. You bet he can sue you.

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  • 1 month ago

    Depending on how broken your legal system is, anyone can sue anyone for anything. Whether the court would agree to hear the case, or would require the plaintiff to show that he had a chance of winning, or whether the plaintiff would be able to find a lawyer willing to represent him, is another matter.

    Many countries have laws that prohibit companies in a particular market from colluding to restrict access to that market - for instance, by agreeing not to buy from a particular supplier. But your telling other publishers, "We wanted to do a deal with this guy, but decided he's more trouble than he's worth," probably wouldn't count as "colluding to restrict access." The other publishers don't have to refuse the guy a deal, just because you said so.

    • 1 month agoReport

      Right, we didn't say "DON'T DO BUSINESS WITH THIS GUY OR ELSE!" We mentioned that this was our experience with the clown, and if they decide to deal with him, they should know what they might be in for.

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  • 1 month ago

    You have to be very careful about making such warnings, because he might be able to go after you for libel. I would just refuse to work with him and block him from contacting you. Anyone who pitches fits like that is not worth your time.

    • Yes- exactly, just blacklist him from ever contacting his company again. And make sure everyone who works with this person’s company knows as well too. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Wow. It's so strange being offered a glimpse into the antics of really, really weird people. Can't you guys keep this sort of cr@p on Twitter, or Facebook? Please!

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  • You crossed the line

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