Do you have to start out with a beginners electric guitar?

I'd like to start learning to play an guitar and I've seen few people recommend a beginner guitar. To me this sounds like a little too much hassle, having to start out with something that might not sound great and going through the difficulty of selling it and buying a better one when I'm more experienced. If I'm honest I'd rather just get something that's decent and will last, and struggle through the difficulty of playing that if there be any. I'm just wondering if this is doable and recommended or if I'm better off just getting a cheaper, easier one for now. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Get a decent 350 dollar Ibanez RG series then and spend a extra 40 or 50 bucks on a chorus pedal unless your amp has that effect. I recommend the Peavey Vypyr amps which are 140 for a 20 Watt practice amp and they have several effects like Chorus and many amp variations built in.

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  • 2 months ago

    You have the same idea that lots of beginners before you have had. While it's a good idea in theory, it turns out to be not a very good idea. As you improve on the guitar and as you've been playing for a while your taste in guitars is almost certainly going to change. And then you're stuck with a too-expensive guitar that's no longer the one you really want.

    You're much better off starting on the best low-cost guitar that you can find...and getting the best professional guitar teacher you can find. If you stick with it you'll eventually want a better guitar and then you can bounce from guitar store to guitar store playing a tone of guitars and eventually finding your next guitar. At that point your old guitar will be useful for times you don't want to risk bringing your good guitar.

    Good luck.

    Source(s): Playing guitar for 57 years
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  • 2 months ago

    Nick, most people come on here looking for the cheapest guitar they can learn on. How refreshing to have somebody who wants to learn on something better!  So here's the deal.....

    "Beginner" guitars are just ones that are low priced...and price is an indicator of quality. Most beginners don't want to lay out a lot of money until they are sure they'll succeed, so the challenge is finding a cheap guitar that's playable.  These fall into the under $200 range.

    When you move into the mid and high priced guitars, the quality improves, they are all easy to play, stay in tune, and sound good. The difference in quality and sound between a $500 and a $1000 electric guitar is definitely real....but very possibly these differences would be lost on a beginner...or even an intermediate player. After a certain price point, the differences become more subtle.

    I always advise people to buy the best quality guitar they can afford, nobody ever regrets buying quality.  If you're just starting out, and can afford a nice mid-priced guitar, go for it.

    Why not go for the higher priced ones? Well, there are real differences between guitars....not of quality, but style and feel.  Once you've learned to play, you may want to try a different style or body type. With an intermediate guitar, you'll have one that will take years to outgrow.....and when you're ready to spend over $1000, you'll have a good idea of what you're looking for.

    For now, if you can afford an intermediate guitar, something like a Fender Standard Stratocaster would be versatile and excellent quality.

    Don't forget you'll also need an amp. A cheap amp will make the best guitar sound like crap.

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  • Tony B
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    There's no such thing as a “beginners electric guitar”. I don't know what the people you've come across recommending one mean!

    You definitely need to get a guitar that's decent, otherwise you might find it's unplayable. I wouldn't worry too much about the sound - as a beginner I doubt a Fender Custom Shop Strat (for example) would sound any better than an entry-level Squier.

    The problem with a really cheap instrument is that there is a good chance that it really will be unplayable and you'll find you've wasted your money.

    You can spend as much as you want but the problem there is that if if you spend maybe 3 or 4 thousand dollars on a guitar and then decide it's not for you when you sell it you'll lose around half its value (which is a lot of money). Half the value of maybe a three hundred dollar guitar is a lot less to lose. Also, if you spend a lot on a Fender style guitar and, as you become a better player, decide you prefer a Gibson style guitar then, again, you've lost a lot of money.

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  • humpty
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The first thing to remember is that the electric guitar is totally different from the acoustic. The tunings may be the same, but the techniques are as different as mandolin and violin.

    I prefer acoustic. I own an Amalio Bourget flamenco guitar and a Celtic Cross resophonic, a Gibson long neck and a Deering Calico banjo as well as mandolins and a bazouki, but no electric. I used to have a Fender Stratocaster but never used it so I gave it to my daughter.

    That is the guitar I will recommend to any beginner, though. You are absolutely right to get a good guitar to learn on, because tone and action are important and yoiu might as well start knowing that.

    I started learning on a horrible Suzuki acoustic swith steel strings and action so bad they cut my fingertips to pieces until I built up the callusses. Be ready for that regardless of what you start on, but an instrument that has well set up action will spare you pain from the first time you pick it up.

    An unrelated word of advice for beginners: work on your chords and then go to jams and watch the better players. The best licks I know were learned by asking someone else "How did you do that?" You can't figure it out all by yourself.

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  • 2 months ago

    It may be a little easier to play a professional quality electric guitar than a beginner's guitar. This is because a beginner's guitar MAY not be as well made which CAN hold you back. But, in reality, they are all good enough to learn on. The reason to start with a beginners guitar is that quality guitars are expensive and it is not worth spending that much money until you know you are going to stick with it and be some good.

    The electric guitar is only half the sound. The rest depends on your amplification and effects. For decent quality gear, expect to spend a LOT of money. Until you are competent, it is not worth spending that much money on PA equipment. A cheap guitar through cheap gear will sound OK but less than perfect. A expensive guitar through cheap gear will sound OK but less than perfect.

    As a rule, a serious musician will always buy the best equipment they can afford and that they can actually use. If you can afford a good guitar, go for it. If you don't master it, you will be able to resell a quality instrument more easily than a cheap beginners guitar.

    • Nick2 months agoReport

      Thank you for the answer :) any specific amps and equipment you'd recommend? Honestly not thinking of anything overly high budget since I'm not going to playing at any gigs any time soon and honestly just want something to practice in my room during lockdown

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  • John
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    You should start with a nylon string acoustic guitar

    • ...Show all comments
    • Hernando
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      That's a really stupid idea, especially when someone is clearly interested in playing the electric guitar.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I wouldnt go too cheap, they get out of tune so quickly need extra work from the repair shop, not worth it. My first guitar was a made in mexico strat, i still use it the most over 15 years later, i think it cost like $400

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  • 2 months ago

    i'd highly recommend the cheapest guitar you can find for your first guitar since 90% of guitars ever sold probably never get played when the buyers realize that learning actually takes time and effort and is quite boring after the first few weeks then for the next few months. if anything, spend the savings on a great Guitar Teacher and invest in a better guitar when you realize you're committed to being a great guitarist.

    • oil field trash
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Yes, my wife has one in the closet right now gathering dust. I'm glad it was a cheap second hand one.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    If you go straight for something more expensive then you have to accept that you may have just spent a lot of money on something you don’t really like. Also a lot of beginners bump their guitars as they don’t quite know how to handle it properly. 

    I started with a cheap guitar, when I finally got myself a better guitar it had dents and scratches on it. Would’ve been gutted if it was a nice guitar that I accidentally knocked over when trying to answer the door 

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