Can one battery die or drainer faster than others ?

For instance say I have six AA batteries in a 1300 lumen flashlight.  All the same brand, capacity and all bought at the same time.  I ask because I had one battery according to my battery tester be at 50%  while the others still had 75% .  I replaced the one lower battery with a newer one so the flashlight would not be so dim.   My concern by replacing that battery with a new one the others will deplete before the new one does.

9 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago

    You are quite right that it's best for batteries, whether in series or parallel, to be all the same make, capacity and condition. You don't have to buy the market leader, check it out online - many other brands perform as well or nearly as well, and the market leaders also rebadge their batteries and allow them to be sold cheaper under another brand name. You can also buy a dedicated charger for alkaline beatteries, so they can be recharged, although makers advise you not to - they want you to throw them away and buy new ones ! I have kept the same batteries going for 5+ years using a charger I built with a free circuit I got from an online site. It does take time to find out how that works best - you can't just leave them on charge for days, this damages them.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    yes          .

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Yes batteries can and often do discharge at different rates.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Yes, that's a problem, especially with cheaper "own brand" cells sold at a budget price. Stick to the good brands and it isn't so big an issue.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yep, it's possible.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    This is a common trouble happens to all battery banks that use multiple cells. Replace the weak one with a new good one is the way to repair and extend the life of battery bank. The total life after repair is still following the weakest one along the whole cells ( your example is 75% even the new good one has 99% power capacity ) . However, one of those 75% cells would be turned into 50% . Replacing all with new good one is the best way but cost more !

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Each cell is like a person ---

    essentially the same as any other, 

    but with a set of individual characteristics that make it slightly unique. 

         

    I have bought a few new alkaline cells that were dead, 

    and two that reversed polarity (at a low voltage). 

    Yes, that can happen! 

         

    Replacing a nearly-new cell that failed with another new one won't be a problem. 

         

    Cells in series (by far the most common arrangement) cannot 'deplete' each other. 

    However, the cell with the highest internal resistance 

    will be the one that limits the maximum possible current in the circuit. 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You are correct. A battery bank can be robbed of efficiency or capacity by its weakest cells. Electric car and other battery manufacturers take pains to make sure that cells are evenly matched.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    A chain is as strong as it's weakest link. Links in a chain like battery's all appear to be identical, but one is going to be weaker then the rest just because of manufacturing inconsistencies. So you replaced the weakest of the cells, there will still be a weakest one and that is not the fault of the new battery.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.