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When did society stop being so homophobic?

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  • reme_1
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Society is still homophobic but they have been getting better since the 70s

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Once at least some of the population gained actual sentience

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Our modern global day society is still 

    highly h0m0 phobic which is a shame if

    you take in the facts that this is a good 

    thing, yo!

    [][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]]][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][][]

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    There's actually been an increase in homophobia and homophobic hate crime in Europe due to mass immigration from the Middle East.

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  • 2 months ago

    When they realized that being homophobic is a waste of time

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  • 2 months ago

    It didn't happen all at once, like the flipping of a light-switch.  You'll have to read a bit of a tale to grasp the entire picture.  And it's best to start off with a caveat about the "stop".

    Western society is much more accepting of homosexuality than it was fifty years ago.  There are still a large number of individuals who are hostile as well as fence-sitters who will voice agreement with them, particularly among straight males.  There are also a significant number of organisations that include suppression of homosexuals and homosexuality among their goals, including a number of non-profit political action committees and "think tanks".  In addition, most Christians, Jews, and Muslims believe that homosexuality is a sin, including many who want to both condemn and punish homosexuals.  So it can't be said that Western society has stopped being homophobic.  But conditions have improved.

    There has been a long, slow trend in that direction in the West for over 150 years, and perhaps longer.  But shame, repression, and hiding were the unbroken rule for homosexuals until the "counterculture revolution" of the mid & late 1960s and early 1970s.  That was a period during which younger people sided with non-conforming members of their parent's generation to question the values and practices they were expected to adopt upon graduation from school. 

    For many young people (particularly college students) this involved rejection of many assumptions that were widely taken for granted by people their parents' age.  They rejected (among other things) racism, war for political or economic ends, economic inequality, pollution and ecological destruction, sexism, religious bigotry, wealth-based justice, and enforcement of arbitrary social expectations.  Their rejection was expressed in writing, art/music, political activism, widespread protests and resistance, riots, and criminal acts including bombings - and in long hair, beards, and "love beads". 

    Many young people embraced this revolt as part of their adolescent rejection of parental authority, and it was associated with frank sexuality and use of recreational drugs.  This "counterculture", non-conformist movement had its roots in authors/poets from earlier generations, but in the USA it's directly associated with Baby Boomers.  Television and film, eager to cash in on an entire generation's economic potential, began to churn out productions sympathetic to the movement's new values.  These included significant gay characters by 1977 (played by straight actors, of course - because no studio would hire a known homosexual).  Ultimately, the counterculture revolution burned out in the late 1970s as Baby Boomers reached the age when they needed job security to start their own families.

    The late 1960s-70s is the point in time when the bulwark of "homophobia" in the West began to buckle, due to the general scepticism and "free-thinking" attitudes in the counterculture movement, especially regarding sexual norms.  It was that spirit that gave rise to the Stonewall riot in New York City (often cited as a watershed moment in Gay Rights, though in reality it was simply a part of the overall counterculture revolt).  There were the first relaxations of legalized suppression of homosexuality.  However, as the Baby Boomers turned their minds to mortgages, insurance, taxes and investments, ALL of the counterculture values they stood for began to fade.  It would have been back to repression as usual, except for ONE BIG THING!

    And that was the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s.  Despite its horrible effect among male homosexuals in particular, and the recoiling of much of the straight population in panic, the overall effect of the epidemic was to turn what had been until then a mainly academic, arms'-length toleration of non-conforming sexuality into open sympathy and support for young gay men.  Again, television and film portrayed young gay men as innocent victims that audiences could identify with.  Public sympathy for both male and female homosexuals donned the mantle of humanism and charity. 

    The AIDS epidemic was, as it turns out, the TRUE watershed moment.  No amount of free-thinking polemics and political activism had been able to shake the studied disinterest of even the most-counterculture Baby Boomers, when it came to "queers".  But the sympathetic reaction to the AIDS epidemic changed that.  Homosexuality became enshrined in the newspaper acronym "LGBT" as a household word - a concept that even schoolchildren were familiar with.  And suddenly, the voices that for centuries had been considered respectable - that cried out for imprisonment and chemical castration for homosexuals - were considered no longer mainstream, but as "the lunatic fringe".  It was at this point that repressive laws began to change, one after another, and homosexuals were extended some legal promises of equal civil rights for the first time.

    A long story - yes - but it provides background for a WARNING:  The past fifty years have seen quite a bit of difference for homosexuals and other sexual minorities.  But in the context of History, they are a blip - an aberration.  It could easily be that, in another fifty years, historians will look back at this period and say "Huh...for a little while it was considered okay, but then the world regained its senses, and we went back to normal - recognizing that perversion must be suppressed!"  As unlikely as it might seem today, Western society could easily revert to its traditional views.  LGBT activists, who today believe that their predecessors' activism was responsible for the changes of the past fifty years (rather than the counterculture movement and AIDS) will categorically reject that possibility - partly out of an uninformed over-estimation of their own importance and influence.  But it is quite possible, nontheless.  The Public is mercurial and history is merciless.

    What if the impact of COVID 19 makes the AIDS epidemic seem entirely insignificant, and most of the sympathy that is now associated with the victims of that illness evaporates?  (If your own kids are starving, it's hard to summon up concern for those who have always been left with little to eat.)  What if TV and film portrayal of sexual minorities goes back to bit characters played only to be laughed and scoffed at?  At this moment, there are MANY who are politically active and influential who are working to see ALL that happen.  And such events and influences could EASILY reverse everything that has improved for homosexuals, bisexuals and transgender people over the past half-century. 

    So keep this historical perspective in mind.

     

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  • Sky
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It wasn't a specific "when".  It's been a gradual process over time as the public's attitude towards homosexuality (or any non-heterosexuality in general) has evolved from intense homophobia and hate towards a more tolerant and accepting attitude.  As more GLBT people have gotten the courage to be out and open about themselves, more and more of the public have been exposed to and interacted with family members, friends, coworkers, etc. who were GLBT, including people like celebrities, personal heroes, and others they look up to.  Then there's also been more and more GLBT characters in TV shows and movies who added to the entertainment of the viewer.  All that has helped break down the ignorance and stereotypes, which breaks down the prejudice and hate, because it's hard to keep continue hating an entire demographic of people which includes someone you know, like, or love.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Not soon enough.....

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  • 2 months ago

    5 minutes ago...

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  • 2 months ago

    When they realized that by putting the focus on some other persons sin - few people would be focusing on theirs.

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