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Darcie
Lv 6
Darcie asked in PetsDogs · 2 months ago

How can I prepare for having a dog?

Hi 👋,

 I want a dog but I can’t at the moment. I live in supported living and not being independent enough and my mum isn’t a dog person. I want to start volunteering with animals, but we haven’t managed to find me a volunteering placement yet. We’ve tried Blue Cross and that hasn’t gone through. We’ve tried RSPCA, but they haven’t had a suitable volunteering vacancy. 

 I would quite a paid job with animals to be able to eventually afford a place where I can have a dog and other animals. I so want a job and/or a volunteering placement with animals. I’m so used to working constantly and haven’t been working for a couple of years since I left college (college, not uni, they’re different here in the UK, look it up, please).

 I’ve been very into dogs since I was about five (I’m now 24). I’m Autistic and my “thing” was dogs. I was obsessed. I would read all about dogs in books (both fictional and non-fictional), watch dog programmes and films (both fictional and non-fictional), pet others’ dogs, help walk a dog that some family members used to look after whilst her people were away and have books about dogs read to me.

 I have also done work experience at a kennel, a rescue centre, a Blue Cross shop, a riding stable, a dog-day care and equestrian centre, another charity book shop, a hedgehog rescue and the Donkey Sanctuary.

 I so badly want a dog and can’t have one at the moment. I even look after soft toy dogs!!! I get really “dog-sick”!!!

 Please help.

Thanks 🙏🏾

 

 

12 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It's great that you have experience with dogs and know what you're getting into - that's an advantage. You mention that you want to have your own place eventually but a dog takes A LOT OF TIME, therefore you can't leave your dog at home alone all day long. Dogs need exercise and attention. You have to be able to walk twice a day and 1-2 hours per day depending on the dog breed. If you can bring your dog to work then there's no problem as long as he feels safe and comfortable. You also have to keep expenses in mind - I spend 65 pounds a month on my medium breed dog. If you expect to live at your current home when you get your dog then it might be easier for you. Help always makes having a dog easier. Your mom could walk and spend time with your dog while you're at work - IF she warms up to him and suddenly becomes a dog person. Also, before I got my dog I bought everything he might need for the next two months and also essential things for the next 6 months. DON'T get a dog if you don't have TIME please - He'll just suffer. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Preparing to get a dog is not very hard. Just incase the dog is not potty trained I would start with getting some dog mats. The second thing i would do is get a few toys tug a war toys balls and so on. Another thing you should get is a soap for dogs. A place you can volunteer to get experience with animals is any vet place. Currently depending where you live it is flea and tick season so when you are able to get a dog i would atleast get a collar or soap that could prevent getting them... with Potty training i would start with taking them out every hour and when the dog or puppy goes bathroom outside give him a treat such as a bone. Good luck i've grown up with dogs all my life make sure that your dog knows its wrong to go potty inside by rubbing your dogs nose with in the mess then clean it up and tell him NO bad dog, then i would take the dog outside Good luck hope you get a great dog when you can

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  • patty
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    GET A budgie. they do 

    not

    require

    as much care as a dog or cat

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  • 2 months ago

    You have asked this SAME series of question at least 3-5 times in the last year.  The answers remain the same (even before the Corvid virus came along).  

    You are not (yet) independent; not even CLOSE!.  Until you can be and can live ON YOUR OWN and in a different type of housing (ALLOWING pets) and YOU can take CARE of the pet; it won't work.  

    We all agreed LAST TIME YOU ASKED THIS:  you need to work towards an independent living skills (which you lack).  Work towards an independent LIFESTYLE, BEFORE you worry about getting a pet.  You must be able to take CARE OF YOURSELF before you can add the responsibility of a dog.

    • ...Show all comments
    • patty
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      this person sounds like he can't look after himself God forbid he gets a pet.

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  • Stella
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You already have some useful answers about finding volunteer positions.

    But I think the most important factor here is improving your independent living skills.

    You can't own or take care of a dog until you can live on your own.

    Learn how to cook, shop for your needs, take care of your clothing, set up a budget, pay your bills, use public transportation, etc.

    Good luck.

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  • Amber
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    You've gone to big rescues not the smaller ones that are begging for help. I live in the UK as well and I volunteer at PACT animals rescue. 

    Just having any job would be good. Putting money aside in savings for when you do get your dog. Start learning how to be more independent and responsible. My cousin in 25 and he lives on his own, drives a car and holds down a job. His thing is cars. He's not good with people or social stuff, he gets very anxious and stutters despite all the speech therapy. He also has a nervous tic that can be very distracting. When hr gets overwhelmed he'll just start to cry, which he did in an interview once. There are many places that will hire people with autism and this interviewer was not put off because he's a damn good mechanic. For a time they just limited his contact with people. Then let him talk to their frequent customers who they knew well and has explained his situation to. This gave him more confidence. You need to get yourself out there. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Food and water bowls. Choose heavy-bottomed ceramic or stainless steel food and water bowls. ...

    Identification tag. By law, all dogs must wear a tag on their collar showing their owner's name and address. ...

    Something to chew on. ...

    Toys to play with. 

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  • 2 months ago

    There are no paid volunteer positions. Volunteer means you do it for free. You cannot get a paid position working with animals when you have no experience working with animals.

    When you start volunteering at pounds, shelters or rescue the new hires are poop picker uppers, cleaning out kennels. Shoveling s hit. Dogs are locked away while this is being done.

    You need to find a regular job with decent pay & just volunteer on weekends. With out any experience you will find it hard to find a job working with animals.

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  • 2 months ago

    Hang in there - I'd suggest now is not the time to be able to find anything that might fit with what you want.   The country (assuming you are talking UK) is in lockdown as you must know.   Eventually when we get back to something near 'normal' I'm sure you'll find an opening to suit.

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Already with work experience normally rescues are happy to offer volunteering vancancies especially those you have got work experience from already, unless they found you were more interested in loving/cuddling the animals and not interested in doing the work required and/or you need assistance....... if that is the case then working directly with animals is unlikely, more likely would be working in one of the many animal charity shops  and in the UK the Government fund charities to offer placements for unemployed/disabled  which is likely what you have already done( for 6-8 weeks normally)...as said immediately the placement is coming to an end is the time to ask if you can continue and volunteer with them.

    As you live in supported living you are correct you will not be gettig a pet as you need support to help you cook, clean and other daily tasks and looking after a pet is something out of your reach..... at this time with covid 19 you will not be offered volunteering or be able to access other potential animal related tasks so maybe you should look at learning more about dog behaviour or training or care and improving your own life skills.

    As a side note I run an animal related business and work with kids, elderly, disabled people with my dogs , a few years ago I was asked by a mum  with an adult child with downs to help him with his fear of dogs as he was begining his independance had a p/t job in a local hotel but if he saw a dog when walking to work he freaked out and she feared he would run into the street and get knocked over ( she had followed him in the car and saw him run out into the road) of course I did and within a very short time he was handling my little dog, was holding her and working her and I asked him to help me ( volunteer) as 'my assistant' when I was helping other local groups ( near to him) and he does still to this day, his story has helped many other people who are frightened of dogs and his confidence has grown along with his handling skills and understanding of 'dog body language'...so don't give up...........

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