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Anonymous asked in Home & GardenGarden & Landscape · 2 months ago

How to fix a yard filled with weeds?

I've been thinking about getting into gardening and planting some different plants in the little yard that my new apartment has! However, the yard is completely overrun with weeds and I'm afraid that using a strong weed killer may prevent new grass and plants from growing.

How can I get started with reviving my yard in preparation for planting in the spring? 

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  • Mr.357
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    If you use a glyphosate it will only kill things it gets on and will be gone within a week.

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  • 2 months ago

    Soil test. Aeration. Now soil with the necessary corrections the soil test stated.(NUTRIENTS LAWN IS LACKING) Now broadcast over lawn. Now seed. Now water.

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  • 2 months ago

    Hi, Farmer here. I invented a new technique. Trample the weeds. Use your cows, use your pigs, use anything u can find and trmple until every last weed is gone forever. except theyre still sort of there so. yeah

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  • 2 months ago

    There are two ways you can start. First buy a product like Weed'n'Feed, which kills broadleaf weeds without killing grass. OR, the better way, is to dig out each weed by hand.  I'm serious. Weed'n'Feed is really meant for places like big lawns where there aren't that many weeds, and there is already a grass cover along with the weeds. 

    Applying any product that kills vegetation will certainly prevent new growth, but it will also remain in the soil for a while keeping new plantings from doing very well. When you have a weedy patch like your lawn, digging out the weeds by hand, then turning over the soil where they were, spreading it around, and applying some new, weed-free dirt on top is a better way to go about this. 

    After you get your weeds out, then you can plant new plants. Next year, see which ones did the best where you put them, and adjust your planting accdordingly. It may take more than one growing season to get things the way you want them. After your lawn is established and you have a good grass cover going, THEN you can apply the Weed'n'feed every year. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Weed and Feed  27-0-02

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  • DEBS
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    If you're planning on growing anything you will eat, then it's very smart to not use any chemicals to kill the weeds.  It does stay in the soil and can end up on your table.  Putting that aside, a lot of the weed killers you find in US stores are banned in other countries because of environmental and health concerns.

    That said, the size of the area you're talking about really matters.  "LIttle yard" could mean 10x10 to some or 40x40 to others.  I assume it's closer to 10x10 or even smaller.  If it were me, not seeing the area, I would likely be pulling by hand and shovel the areas that I wanted to plant in.  That helps break up the soil for planting as well.  The areas I don't want to plant in can be maintained by doing a quick knock-down/pulling of large weeds and putting down a weed barrier followed by bags of mulch/bark.  

    • Weeds and what they Tell us. Pfeiffer
      Weeds: Control without Poison ..Walters
      Weeds: Guardians of the Soil Coccanouer

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  • 2 months ago

    Depends what you mean by overrun with weeds. If there's a lot of growth, get rid of that somehow, whether you use a weed eater, shears or whatever doesn't matter ,just get rid of the rubbish.  Then you can see what you're left with. Some of it you can shift by digging, some by using a systemic weedkiller. That only attacks the living plants it touches, and goes inert in the soil after a day or so, so you can replant/sew after that.  You'd still have to remove the dead weeds.  Then I suggest you're in for some digging over.  Have fun!  I enjoy a challenge like that . . . .

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  • 2 months ago

    You can use a weedkiller that becomes inactive once it hits the soil, so chose carefully. If a weedkiller says t's for paths and patios, it means it remains in the soil and you won

    t be able to replant. A systemic weedkiller will be absorbed into the weed and slowly kill it totally. A contact weedkiller will kill the green part of the plant but the roots will continue growing. Use a pump type sprayer which is the most efficient and econimical way of applying the spray.

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  • 2 months ago

    You can dig up the weeds.

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  • 2 months ago

    First of all, grass is a weed with good press coverage. Just use a typical weed killer/fertilizer combination to kill the "bad" weeds. The fertilizer will help the grass to grow and push the other weeds out.

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