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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Social ScienceGender Studies · 2 months ago

How can a woman rape a man? Do they tie him up and anally penetrate him using strap on dildos? ?

Otherwise how is it possible to rape a man if he does not get hard ?

Update:

Bill -  i know about morning wood. I know that sometimes erections are not under men’s control. But tell me, would you get erection when you are in that threatening situation ? I mean how can any man get erection when they are being assaulted?

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  • Bill
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    So are you a woman or a child? I ask because morning wood is pretty common knowledge and I fail to see how an adult man wouldn't know of it's existence. 

    Furthermore, an adult man would also know that erections are not something men control, so this idea that being hard by itself means something to the equation is not something a thinking man would ponder, let along believe. 

    Edit: You really should read some material on this if you can't get it. One of the common ways women sexually assault men is to attack them in their sleep. She jumps on when you're asleep, so after a moment you wake up and there she is. That's of course assuming you wake up, which may not even happen. 

    Another common way is by drugs, which as you might expect is done in exactly the same way men drug women using exactly the same drugs to do it. Yes, you should be taking the same precautions as women when getting drinks at parties. Those straws that detect drugs are for both sexes, not just women. 

    Lastly, to answer your question, in times of assault sexual arousal can not be controlled for men or women, so really its not a matter what you want, but a matter of what happens. 

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  • 2 months ago

    That's an example. Men also get hard at times they cannot control even if they aren't aroused.

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  • 2 months ago

    Women have stuck broken bottles up men's anuses. That's pretty much rape.

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  • 2 months ago

    To use your logic, does that mean that women who report that they lubricated during rape "really wanted it"? Applying it the same way you just did, "Would you get wet in a threatening situation?"

    And you show your ignorance of male biology. Erections are not "sometimes" *not* under our control. They are only RARELY *under* our control.

    Any man who claims he never gets unwanted erections probably doesn't get any at all. I'm 64 and I still get them.

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  • 2 months ago

    guys dont give her any ideas

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  • 2 months ago

    Think of tools, such as broom handles. The legal issue is consent, and drunkenness (for one) can obviate consent.

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  • Dooby
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The same way a greater percentage of women orgasm while being raped than the general female population does during everyday consensual sex.

    ... square that circle.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Research about male-victim rape had only just begun to appear by 1980, focusing mostly on male children. The studies of sexual assault in correctional facilities focusing specifically on the consequences of this kind of rape were available in the early 1980s, but nothing was available during the previous years. Most of the literature regarding rape and sexual assault focuses on female victims.

    Only recently have some other forms of sexual violence against men been considered. In the 2010–2012 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (and a prior edition of this study completed in 2010), the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) measured a category of sexual violence called "being made to penetrate" which captures instances in which victims were forced to or attempt to sexually penetrate someone (of either sex), either by physical force or coercion, or when the victim was intoxicated or otherwise unable to consent. The CDC found in the 2012 data that 1.715 million[8] (up from 1.267 million in 2010)[9] reported being "made to penetrate" another person in the preceding 12 months, similar to the 1.473 million[8] (2010: 1.270 million)[9] women who reported being raped in the same time period. The definitions of rape and "made to penetrate" in the CDC study were worded with extremely similar language.

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  • 2 months ago

    Morning wood. It’s hard every morning. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Have you ever gotten an erection when you didn't want to? Most guys have experienced it at least once in their lives. That is how or do you need more detail?

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