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Andy Lucia asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 2 months ago

WW2: If Rommel didn't agree with Nazi "policies" then why was he fighting for them?

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  • 2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    When he took the oath of allegiance to hitler, the general staff had buried their heads in the sand like a flock of emus. the loyalty oath was a deal hitler had cut with the general staff. it worked like this. if the general staff validates the actions hitler and the ss took in disarming the SA during and after "the night of the long knives," hitler agreed to let disarm the party except for the SS which was not that large in 1934 compared to the SA.

    • F
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      It’s Ostriches that bury their heads in the sand.

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  • 2 months ago

    At the point when he made the vow of loyalty to hitler, the general staff had covered their heads in the sand like a group of emus. the dedication pledge was an arrangement hitler had cut with the general staff. it worked this way. in the event that the general staff approves the activities hitler and the ss took in incapacitating the SA during and after "the evening of the long blades," hitler consented to let incapacitate the gathering aside from the SS which was not unreasonably huge in 1934 contrasted with the SA. 

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  • 2 months ago

    He was a general, soldiers of all ranks have to take and give orders. Rommel was involved in a assassination attempted on Hitler which was why he died at the hands of the gestapo

    • David2 months agoReport

      As far as I recall from my reading, he wasn't actively involved. He was invited to participate but chose to do nothing. He was to take control of forces in France. His not reporting it was why he was "invited" to kill himself. Actively involved he'd have found himself on a meat hook too.

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  • Vahe
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    Erwin Rommel had commanded Nazi forces in North Africa (the Afrika Korps), but D-Day and the faltering German campaigns on the Eastern Front made him rethink his support for Hitler by joining a group of Nazi generals plotting to assassinate Hitler.

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  • 2 months ago

    Just because you were a German soldier does not make you a Nazi.

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  • xyzzy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    As with most of the General Staff, Rommel did not consider himself fighting for the Nazis he considered himself fighting for Germany.

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  • 2 months ago

    Not all of Hitler's generals were pro-policy.

    Here is an excerpt from Hitler's last testament made less than 12 hours before he committed suicide:

    "Before my death, I expel the former Reichsmarschall Hermann Goering from the party and deprive him of all rights which he may enjoy by virtue of the decree of June 29th, 1941; and also by virtue of my statement in the Reichstag on September 1st, 1939, I appoint in his place Grossadmiral Doenitz, President of the Reich and Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces.

    Before my death, I expel the former Reichsfuehrer-SS and Minister of the Interior, Heinrich Himmler, from the party and from all offices of State. In his stead, I appoint Gauleiter Karl Hanke as Reichsfuehrer-SS and Chief of the German Police, and Gauleiter Paul Giesler as Reich Minister of the Interior.

    Goering and Himmler, quite apart from their disloyalty to my person, have done immeasurable harm to the country and the whole nation by secret negotiations with the enemy, which they conducted without my knowledge and against my wishes, and by illegally attempting to seize power in the State for themselves.

    In order to give the German people a government composed of honorable men,—a government which will fulfill its pledge to continue the war by every means—I appoint the following members of the new Cabinet as leaders of the nation:

    President of the Reich: DOENITZ

    Chancellor of the Reich: DR. GOEBBELS

    Party Minister: BORMANN

    Foreign Minister: SEYSS-INQUART

    [Here follow fifteen others.]...

    ...Given in Berlin, this 29th day of April 1945. 4:00 A.M.

    ADOLF HITLER"

    Rommel's name isn't listed here, but perhaps he was one of the fifteen not listed. And perhaps he was one of those thrown out of the party. But it's made clear here that just because you were a member of the party doesn't mean you adhered to it faithfully without having your own agenda.

    There are those who will undoubtedly disregard this, as they do with everything connected to Hitler "just because". These are the ones who have no business weighing in on any of the discussions here or anywhere since they show obvious bias which they hope to infect everyone else with.

    At this point, when he was about to end his life, he had no reason to lie about anything. It would be as accurate as a death-bed confession.

    The entire testament includes other references that give a glimpse of his mindset and the reasons he did what he did. It's an interesting read for anyone who has the mental capacity to understand it for what it is and not deny what they don't agree with. Whether you agree with something or not is no reason to disregard the facts.

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    • nonpartisan
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      Okay...thanks for the update. It doesn't really change anything about his views of Nazi policy and how he acted on them, but without documentation associated with him in that respect to know which way he leaned, it becomes a moot point. 👍

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    He was a military man ... not a politician. Even as a military man, he defied some of Hitler's orders.

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    • anon99
      Lv 5
      2 months agoReport

      No large Einsatzgruppen were used in North Africa they were only small uints under Rauff who did murder Jews in North Africa

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Why did 60,000 men climb out of trenches at the Somme to be cut down like wheat they knew they wouldn't get there 

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  • 2 months ago

    He was fighting for his country not the Nazi party.

    • Lv 4
      2 months agoReport

      good answer; also, Rommel was never involved with such policies nor ever participated in doing them

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  • Dj2541
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    He was a soldier in the German Army, doing his  duty  as a  soldier. Soldiers  all  over the  world may not  agree  with  the  ideology of their  Govt but  as  soldiers they  are  sworn  to serve  their  country?

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