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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Social SciencePsychology · 2 months ago

Changes after domestic abuse ?

Hi. I didn’t know where else to ask this. 

I don’t know why, but loud noises are something that has never bothered me before that I get really scared by after my abusive relationship. Did anyone else find this?

I work in a industry where there are lots of loud noises before this all happened and it was always fine, I liked it.

Now I find that hammering, any sort of sudden loud noise really makes me flinch and I can feel it in my chest and I’m just really sensitive to it and it just scares me.

I understand the flinching when someone moves suddenly around me, which is really embarrassing and I try really hard to not. But the loud noise thing I’ve always wondered? 

Can anyone help me? 

7 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    I was mugged a while ago and would panic whenever anyone walked near me. This went on for over 2 years, but slowly became less and less. I'll still get an attack once every 18 months or so (I was mugged over 20 years ago) Your reaction is absolutely normal - it does get better, but it will take time. 

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  • Carmen
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    Are you still in a abusive relationship? Fear doesn't go away as quickly as other things unfortunately especially if you're still afraid or don't feel safe. Pray for a safe place for yourself pray for courage to move pass this terrible experience pray for a calm heart and peace of mind and pray the abusive person changes their way of life and treat people like human beings. 

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  • OTTO
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    PTSD. Your panic button is stuck in the On position. Meditation is supposed to turn it off (research with Veterans suggests this as a solution).

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    This is PTSD. Various therapy techniques can help.

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  • Jesere
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    What's happening is you have a split second adrenaline rush from the fight or flight response. You body stiffens your hands start to make a fist, you duck slightly and close then open your eyes quickly. I call it the "Flinch Factor". I have it from being physically abused by my parents and my husband. I'm 63 and I still flinch.

    • erin2 months agoReport

      I’m sorry you had to go through that ☹️ Thank you for your answer! 

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  • 2 months ago

    Hi I work with women who have C-PTSD; PTSD, BD & BPD along with all serious co-occuring and chronic symptoms.

    If your abuse was chronic is is probably C-PTSD not PTSD.  It might be BPD but I have no idea.  Research all of those terms for the rest of your life.

    The term "startle Effect" was coined for ptsd but is relevant it BPD & C-PTSD.  Technically there are lots of things you should research.  But technically it's called hypervigilance

      Your brain is in full protect you mode.  It's different than paranoia or delusions.  Your concerns are legitimate...  Am I being followed, is the door locked, what was that sound, why are they so close when social distancing is done. THEN BAAM! Holy wtf!  Your brain knows loud sounds were bad in the past so now it goes nuts...  it is on hyperdrive.  It does not like being caught off guard.  That's a good question.....

    I am bored for the next 2 weeks.  If there are more questions ask.....  your life is changed, well your brain...  neutochemically, biologically (structure & more).  Its manageable but pending your age/ gender it gets much worse every year if you do nothing

    Listenforyou@protonmail.com 

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  • martin
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You are suffering still from the abuse you endured. You need to take care of yourself by using logic. When loud noises turn out not to be threatening to you, then logically you should not fear.

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