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Hindusufi asked in Society & CultureRoyalty ยท 2 months ago

Why do the Brits use the title Earl rather then Count?

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  • Clo
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    It is a cultural difference.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl

    In Anglo-Saxon Britain, the term Ealdorman was used for men who held the highest political rank below King. Over time the Danish eorl became substituted for Ealdorman, which evolved into the modern form of the name.The Norman-derived equivalent count (from Latin comes) was not introduced following the Norman conquest of England though countess was and is used for the female title. Geoffrey Hughes writes, "It is a likely speculation that the Norman French title 'Count' was abandoned in England in favour of the Germanic 'Earl' [โ€ฆ] precisely because of the uncomfortable phonetic proximity to ****."

    The title originates in the Old English word eorl, which means"a man of noble birth or rank."

    • Hindusufi
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Very good Clo.

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  • Jas B
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Because Count is a French Title.

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    • Jas B
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Yes and like many French words they are anglicised.ย  For example Beef is from the Old French buef, (Modern French boeuf) But the title is one which was given by French Kings.ย 

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  • 2 months ago

    Earl is a higher rank than Count

    • Hindusufi
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      So then why is the wife of an Earl called Countess?

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  • 2 months ago

    https://elitetitles.co.uk/earl_countess.html

    I'd imagine most of what you need to know, is in this article.

    • Hindusufi
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Good answer and good link.ย  But I have to give best answer to Clo.ย  Had to make a choice.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Earl is an Anglo-Saxon title, slightly above Thane. In an absolute monarchy it was something akin to a governor and there was no special title for the wife of an Earl. After the Norman Conquest the title became the equivalent of Count but the AS term was retained. The wife of an Earl was acknowledged as a Countess (since ear-less would be very strange).

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  • 2 months ago

    Count is not a UK title.

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  • A long time ago (think pre-Norman conquest) the only title of nobility in England was an earl (also sometimes known as an ealdorman or a duke). When William I came to power, he introduced a new rank of title - baron - to denote those to whom he had personally given a title. He limited the rank of earl to be equivalent to the French rank of Comte. Other ranks of the peerage were introduced in subsequent centuries, modelled on French ranks.ย 

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  • 2 months ago

    Count is used too because when Michael Howard was still in politics they would say "now it's over to the Count at Folkstone and Hythe."

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  • 2 months ago

    Earl is a Saxon title, Count a French one (Norman/French). For the longest time the English aristocracy, outside the royal family, was composed of earls and barons,.I believe intermarriage with French and German princes and princesses brought the ranks of vicomte,count, marquis and others into British usage.

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