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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsHorses · 2 months ago

when would you keep a horse in a stable and when should they be free range in a paddock?

7 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Depends on where I’m at and what my horses are doing. If I’ve got them somewhere for work then they do whatever the other work horse do depending on the facilities. If I’ve got them at home then they stay out in a cow field. I’ll think about stalling them for part of the day if their is to much green grass to help maintain their healthy weight. Otherwise they prefer to stay out. 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You can turn them out in a paddock in the morning and bring them back in at dinner time provided you don't want to catch them earlier to ride them.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I live in the UK so we get no extreme weather, no large pray animals to cause them damage and we have the opportunity to buy native breeds which are hardy. My horses lived out 24/7. We built a barn large enough for all over them out in the field for shelter if they wanted it. In there we put constant access to a good quality hay and fresh water. My horses (even my tb) mostly only used it in the summer to escape the flies. I didn't use any rugs on my horses.

    I stabled my horses only when they were sick or injured, which was very rare. Or in an epidemic is my vet advice it. We had an outbreak of strangles one year. It meant more grooming when I wanted to do anything with them, but I wasn't going to lock them up all the time just to avoid being lazy. Spending an hour grooming my horses is never a bad thing and if I can't make that time for them, then I shouldn't have them. 

    I know people who stabled there horses at night regardless of the weather. I've also known some ex-race horses and an ex-jumper and along with other medical issues from their lives, they had spent their lives in a stable. One was prone to stomach ulcers and would wind suck. The other would kick the walls for hours and weave. The jumper wouldn't even go in a stable anyone. He'd never known freedom in a pasture. That's what locking up horses for hours can do to them. 

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  • 2 months ago

    I keep my horses at pasture with a run-in.  This is an appropriately sized pole barn in their field, with two large sliding doors at each end, so they can enter and leave as they choose and no horse can be trapped inside by the other horses. 

    They tend to stay in the field most of the time, even in midwinter.  They do spend a lot of time in it when the bugs are bad during the day in the summers - the dark interior helps keep the flies away.

    I put them in their stalls for vet visits, when it's below 0F and windy, if they're injured, and things like  that.  Also when, as Snezzy says, I need them to stay clean for an event.

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  • Snezzy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Our 20 horses all live outdoors in most kinds of weather. The exceptions for when they go into stalls are:

    (1) Sleet and freezing rain. 

    (2) Medication. Deworming and shots are much easier when the horse is in his stall.

    (3) Early event tomorrow, can't spend half the morning trying to catch a horse who has decided that bouncing around on several acres is preferable to whatever work he imagines we want him to do. Similarly if we need a clean horse and everything underfoot is mud.

    If you take your horse who has been in a stall for a few days and turn him out where he can run and roll, you'll see signs of immense joy. He will first dash madly up and down even a small paddock, and then will lie down and roll in dust or mud to get those filthy saddle goblins off his withers.

    By the way, paddock and free range are technically different. Genuine free range involves not even having fences. Most horses don't get that luxury, and the ones who do tend to remain at home anyway, just like other domestic animals. The open range of Australia and of the American West have been used, at least in the past, for successful keeping of sheep and cattle. As far as I can tell, Yakut horses in Siberia don't have fences.

    You might ask, "If there are no fences, how do you tie your horse up when you're out of the saddle, doing something other than riding? Like dealing with a sick cow, or whatever? There aren't trees out there on the West Texas flat plains!" The answer is the the horse is taught to "ground tie" so he knows that when the reins (or a rope) are dropped to the ground he must not move.

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  • PR
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Inside during:

    -Extreme weather, too hot or too cold.

    -Excessive wind chill which could cause wind burn to the ears or other delicate areas.

    -Too wet, causing either slippery footing, or danger of hoof fungus or rot. 

    -Icy conditions which might cause slipping, broken bones or pulled tendons.

    -During night-time hours, although some people leave their horses out day and night. No horse should be outside at night without a pasture-mate.

    Outside during good weather, and with plenty of water.

    Horses should be out as much as possible, since this is normal and allows exercise and metal stimulation. Being outside helps them avoid habits due to stall confinement. But, if weather does not allow, some people will give the horses time in an indoor arena to run about, or simply ride them.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    We bring our guys in at night during bad weather for their comfort but usually they prefer to be out in either the loafing shed or the trees that act as a wind break.

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