What is the correct sentence?

He works only on Wednesdays.

He works only at Wednesdays.

11 Answers

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  • 4 weeks ago
    Favourite answer

    While "He works only on Wednesdays." is correct, what is more precise is: "He only works on Wednesdays." That should have "only" before "works".

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    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      Cara's answer is (as usual) spot on. "He works only on Wednesdays" means "He doesn't work on any days except Wednesdays". While it's common to say "He only works on Wednesdays", strictly speaking that means that WORKING is the only thing he does on Wednesdays; he doesn't sleep or eat or go out..

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    on is the correct sentence.  You can use "at" if Wednesdays is a shop. 

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  • ron h
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    What is "Wednesdays?"  Is it like TGI Fridays?  Unless it's a place of some kind of  particular task, "at" makes no sense. 

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  • 4 weeks ago

    the 1st one  .

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  • 4 weeks ago

    The first unless Wednesdays is the place that he works at.

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    The first is correct. We work on days, not at them.

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  • Cara
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    "He works only on Wednesdays" means that Wednesdays are the only days he works.

    "He only works on Wednesdays" means that he does nothing on Wednesdays except work.

    "He works only at Wednesdays" is wrong. We don't use "at" with days of the week or months.

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  • 1 month ago

    days are not a place so on wednesdays and not AT wednesdays (unless that is the name of a store or restaurant, which is possible, I suppose).  There are dialects of English that do use "at" in many situations that most English speakers would use "on" (or in) though, so you tend to need to know how others speak if you want to fit in.

    In this specific case, I have never heard anyone say "at" for a day.  At a specific time, certainly (He works at 10 in the morning so let him sleep in), but not for a generic day.

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  • David
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The 1st sentence is correct.

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  • Teresa
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    He works only on Wednesdays.

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