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Native English speakers, could you please help me with these issues?

1. Would any average person ever say:

a) "What do you have in agenda?"

Or even

b) "What's in agenda?"

2. Or is the term 'agenda' reserved for government (or elite) personnel, and to more formal duties?

3. Is this sentence correct:

"The restautant is IN a hilly road."

3 Answers

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  • 1 month ago
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    1- Neither A or B sound right at all.  "What's on your agenda," is closer to reality.

     

    2- No, it's basically just a slang term for a person's plans.

     

    3- No, that is wrong.  "The restaurant's on a hilly road," would be closer to reality.

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  • 1 month ago

    An agenda is a thing, so, we need to put an article in front of it, like "the" or "an."  "What is on the agenda for today?"  "Do you have the agenda for the meeting?"  This is an everyday word for all sorts of settings.  Most meetings will have an agenda to lay out what the meeting is about.  It is not an elite thing at all.

    A restaurant might be "on" a road, or "beside" a road, or even "near" a road, but, never "in" the road.  That would make it in the way!  I.e., part of the roadway itself.

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  • 1 month ago

    1. on the agenda

    2. no

    3. on a hilly road

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