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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsGolf · 1 month ago

If PGA doesn't want to lose business and ratings, they need to allow golf players like Happy Gilmore to play. True or no?!?

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  • Bob
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    That's  false.  I don't  think the PGA tour is losing business or ratings and don't see why they would,and even if they did, you can't just show up on the PGA  tour.He would have had to turn professional, then  pay $5,000 to enter PGA Tour Qualifying School get past the first two stages to earn status on the Korn Ferry  Tour and get through an entire season and finish in the top 25 to earn status on the PGA Tour. 

    He could also turn professional and if he didn't have status he could be awarded  up to 7 sponsor exemptions in one year , however, if he did not do well they would probaly stop giving them to him

    He could  pay $500 and try to four spot for a PGA Tour event. Since he  does not have any kind of status he'd have to play a pre-qualifying event and finish in the top 10 just to earn a spot in the Monday qualifier where the top 4 finishers get a spot in that week's event.He'd then have to finish in the top 10 that week to be guaranteed a spot in the following week's event .

    So, to sum it up, yes  it would be possible but very difficult for him to do and very unlikely that he could do it,but yes it's theoretically possible.

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  • 1 month ago

    no. they need more trophies in a tournament (other than the winner trophy).   such as nearest to the pin, which is the closest ball to the pin on a par 3.   OR the longest drive on a par 5 fairway from the tee.   it is not the pros fault that PGA tour is boring because they are doing the same thing for over 20 years.  Make something new.  

    the PGA tour can hire me for being a marketing guy because I have been watching the Tourneys since 2006 and it gets too boring....  

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  • I'm not even sure where to start.

    The film Happy Gilmore gets so many basic facts wrong that it's hard to count. Offhand, nobody just shows up on a professional tour. Winning a state/city open would never, under any circumstance, be a gateway. For the fictional movie to have truth, Gilmore would have had to turn professional, pay $5,000 to enter PGA Tour Qualifying School (i.e. Q School) and get past the first two stages to earn status on the Korn Ferry (formerly Web.com, Nationwide, Nike, etc.) Tour and get through an entire season and finish in the top 25 to earn status on the PGA Tour.

    If Gilmore turned professional and didn't have status he "could" get up to 7 sponsor exemptions in one year (Tiger Woods turned professional in 1996 and was given sponsor exemptions, but he was coming off of 3 straight US Amateur championships and was being projected as the next big thing). However, after a few missed cuts it says here that tournaments will cut that gravy train off. The only other example of a sponsor exemption working out was Phil Mickelson winning a Tour event in Arizona while he was still in college (he still had amateur status, which meant no prize money but he did have a 2-year exemption for winning an event which all players get who win Tour events).

    OR, pay $500 and try to 4-spot for a PGA Tour event. Since Gilmore does not have any kind of status he'd have to play a pre-qualifying event and finish in the top 10 just to earn a spot in the Monday qualifier where the top 4 finishers get a spot in that week's event (where you're going to be up against people who have won tournaments and majors but who lost their status).

    He'd then have to finish in the top 10 that week to be guaranteed a spot in the following week's event (so all of his finishes of 27th, 54th, etc. meant he would have had to Monday qualify for each week's event).

    Plus, Gilmore would have never been permitted to wear boots. He would be required to wear golf shoes with softspikes (or spikeless shoes), and a collared shirt, and actual non-denim trousers.

    Good time to mention that unless he's even cheaper than Matt Kuchar, he has to pay his caddie. A flat fee for the week, then a percentage of earnings (percentages vary, but a common model might be 10% for a win (if you win $1,000,000 your caddie would get 10%, or $100,000 off the top), 5-7% for a top 10/top 25 finish, and 3-5% for top-50/made cut.

    The Tour has not and has no plans on announcing suspensions. They never did when John Daly had one of his episodes, nor did they announce a suspension for Dustin Johnson back in 2009-10 over what was reported was a positive drug test for cocaine.

    • Bob
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      1- the Movie Happy Gilmore was a comedy,and they weren't trying to be realistic.2- Yes Kuchar is cheap but he did pay his caddy,not as much as he should have but he did pay him.

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