if you know the blue book value for a certain car. should you bargain with the dealership if they are overpriced?

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  • 1 month ago

    You should bargain with the seller even if they aren't overpriced.  Why would anyone leave money on the table?

    Here's the bottom line:  If you really could get a lower price for the same vehicle somewhere else, you would.  And if the seller could get a better offer for that vehicle from someone else, they would.

    Blue Book, Carfax, Edmund's and all those other websites don't mean Jack Schitt.  If the vehicle isn't worth what the seller is asking, walk away and find something else.

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  • 1 month ago

    That's the way everybody does it.

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  • 1 month ago

    You always offer less money jojo.

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  • 1 month ago

    Used car dealers don't care where you got your prices -- that's not where he gets his prices. His prices are based on local market conditions, competition, and what he paid for the car (usually at auction) -- not on some book. He'll only laugh if you try to convince him that your blue book value is a fair price.

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  • 1 month ago

    Absolutely. That is why Kelley publishes Blue Books.

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  • 1 month ago

    No. They will just tell you to sell the car yourself. That's the way everybody does it.

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  • 1 month ago

    Well, what determines "overpriced"? There are tons of new sites out there that can show you whether or not a vehicle's price is within reason or a bad deal. 

    Dealers haven't used Kelley's numbers for decades. They rely on Manheim Auction values. You'd have better luck if you had some similar vehicles sold in your area to be able to use as a frame-of-reference when you go in to bargain. After all, if a very close match to your wanted car is being sold for $2K less when it's only a few miles away, a dealer may be more prone to drop their price. 

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  • Ron
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    dealers don't use blue book for their valuation, they use NADA. Regardless, they don't care

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  • 1 month ago

    You can try to bargain.  There's no law against it.  I'm a used car dealer and I've had plenty of "customers" who try to offer me a lower price than what I have listed on the vehicle.  Worse thing that happens is that I say no.  But keep in mind, some of the dealers who sell cars for cheap, is because of "financial constraints" meaning they got the cheapest, least desirable car, with minimal reconditioning.  This also applies to more expensive vehicles, but tends to be more prevalent in "dirt cheap" cars.  So inspect any potential purchase very carefully, otherwise you could end up buying an expensive bucket of bolts.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    90% of people don't have the first clue what "blue book" is, or black book or nada.

    You should always bargain with any dealer. But cars in exceptional condition bring premium prices.

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