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Is music theory important to singing?

I had a small argument with a friend once. I said I’m a good singer now and he said I don’t know music theory though and I said I sing what I hear and he said you need to know the theory and said I can’t go high. 

Does music theory help with vocal range? 

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  • 3 months ago
    Favourite answer

    I hold multiple degrees in music theory - and I taught Voice and Choral Music in the schools of NY for over 25 years.  Yes, voice *technique* - range, support,  color, even tone, agility, etc. are one aspect of singing. But if you do not know how to read music - meaning SIGHTSING - then you are a useless burden to those around you. You are at the mercy of "play this for me first".  Musically, a baby.  They are precious few situations in life where ignorance is better than education! They are zillions of people who think that THEIR idea of a nice sounding voice, is going to get them work - never mind fame and fortune.  With all the education yuh can get - maybe you stand a chance.  Maybe.  

    Source(s): I hand made every single dollar in my life in live music performance, music education, studio teaching, adjudication, and allied prifessiinal music employment. THOUSANDS of live paid solo performances as well.
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  • 3 months ago

    Many of the best vocalists of all time had no formal music education.

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  • 3 months ago

    You can sing without a knowledge of music theory, however, some theory can help in your development as a singer, e.g., understanding rhythm, dynamics, phrasing, articulation, musical notation, can help in your delivery.

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  • Tony B
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    “Music theory” has nothing to do directly with being able to sing. Obviously though in some circumstances being able to read music, understand and know scales, intervals etc. would be helpful.

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    • Tony B
      Lv 7
      3 months agoReport

      Or unless it's just a matter of “singing”, not being a professional or even serious semi-professional “singer”.

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    no, and it won't help your vocal range. i guess you have to ask yourself: do you want to write songs or otherwise participate in the creative side of things or are you just content to perform?

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    No. It is a Money Maker for schools.

    How many singers do you believe valued it, in their early days.

    Most talent is natural, not educated.

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  • Nick
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    it helps a lot, it let you do a lot of more things that now you don't think about

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  • 3 months ago

    Music theory has nothing to do with vocal range.  It has to do with understanding how music is composed.  A singer can sing without knowing any music theory.  They simple repeat what they hear.

    But if a singer understands music theory - why a song is composed the way it, how to create harmonies to the song, what changes in how the song is performed can make it fresher or sound better - that can help their performance.  It give them more options to how they perform their songs.

    Some people are able to hear and perform harmonies, make changes in the music, improve the music, etc.  "naturally."  They just have an inborn talent for that.

    Most of the rest of us have to learn some music theory to understand how to do things like that.  

    Music theory has very little to do with "how to song".  Has to do with how music is composed.  Why it sounds the way it does.  What combinations of notes give what feelings.  What beats or rhythms have what affect on the music.   Knowing those things can improve your ability to "owe" a song and make it yours, rather than just sounding like whoever originally sang the song.

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