Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 5 months ago

Why is our planet earth the only planet to support life?

16 Answers

Relevance
  • 5 months ago
    Favourite answer

    "that we know of".

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 5 months ago

    We don't know it's the only one; but, it's the only one we're aware of so far. It's capable of life because of the resources we have, and our position from the star we orbit.  While other worlds may harbor more exotic types of life in what we would consider harsher environments - so far, we've not discovered any... but, we've only just begun to look. 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Clive
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Who says it is?  There could be others, for all anyone knows.  We just don't know about them because of the huge distance.

    In our own solar system, yes the Earth is the only one that clearly has lots of life on it, and that is for a number of reasons;

    - it's the right temperature for liquid water, and that's probably necessary for life

    - it has an unusually big satellite called the Moon which keeps it stable - without that it would wobble around more and have too much variation of temperature for life to survive

    - it has a magnetic field, which protects us from cosmic rays and ensures there aren't too many mutations

    - it's big enough to hold on to an atmosphere.

    That narrows it down quite a lot if we're looking for other planets that could have life, but it's a big universe so that doesn't necessarily narrow it down to none except us.

    • lewac5 months agoReport

      Good answer, Clive. life as we know it means it can't have too much gravity and it can't have too little. too much and we fall down we don't get up again (how many people can lift TWICE their weight?... not many). too little and we have no atmosphere.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 5 months ago

    Because Absence of Proof is not Proof of Absence

    Attachment image
    • Ronald 7
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      We got lucky

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • Tom S
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    That is quite an assumption, there.  Have you really checked every place in the universe to come to that conclusion?

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Joseph
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Because our pool of planets that we know can support life is currently rather limited.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 5 months ago

    Earth is the only planet 

    that supports life "that we currently know of".

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    We don't know it's the only planet.  We just haven't found life on the other bodies we've visited.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 5 months ago

    It's the only one that we know of because our ability to explore beyond our own planet is insanely limited.  We now understand that it is insanely likely that life exists outside of our planet, but what shape that life will take may disappoint a great number of people.  After all, everyone's expecting little green men, but in reality the first aliens we encounter may be little more than single-celled organisms.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    It isn’t. Fossilized bacteria was discovered on mars. 

    • ...Show all comments
    • Clive
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Wrong.  No such thing was discovered, though a possible one was found and later discovered to be an artefact of preparing it for the electron microscope.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.