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How does the electoral college work?

My question is how do the electors in the electoral college decide who they're state's votes go to and how does this represent what the people of the state want? Will the electors vote for whichever candidate won that state? 

13 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    FIRST OFF THE NUMBER ELECTORS EACH STATE HAS IS THE TOTAL OF THE NUMBER OF REPRESENTATIVES  AND SENATORS THEY HAVE.

    THEY MEET IN WASHINGTON AT THE END OF THE YEAR AND CAST THEIR BALLETS   THERE IS NOTHING IN THE CONSTITUTION ABOUT WHO THE CAN VOTE FOR.  THEY CAN VOTE FOR WHOEVER THEY WANT BUT SOME STATES HAVE PUT RESTRICTIONS ON THEM

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  • Prince
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    It works for wealthy people who own large, empty tracts of land. For instance, I own a large empty state with nothing but my own servants, tenant farmers and sychophants on it, my wife owns her share of the Lazy River brand, and we don't want some damn "majority" of the American people getting OUR fair share of power or Federal money. The majority of the American people voted for Hillary Clinton, but they are the bottom 99%, and we could not have THAT. So we had the Electoral College overturn the will of the Bottom Ninety-Nine Per Cent who are all gnarly have-nots and poor people anyway. 

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  • 1 month ago

    The founding fathers made the electoral college to prevent the tyrannical majority from controlling the minority.

    ,

    Imagine if you have a dollar and me and my cameraman both vote to take your dollar that's democratic.

    That's the majority, but that's not fair and the founding fathers knew this.

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    Imagine states like Montana, Wyoming, New Mexico, states with low populations, if there is no electoral college.

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    That means states like California New York and Texas would dominate these states.

    These smaller states with smaller Populations wouldn't have a voice without the electoral college.

    ,

    The founding fathers made the Electoral College, So that even the smallest minority would have a voice in all elections. 

    You need to actually read it for yourself so maybe you will understand a little more about it and NOT DEPEND ON WHAT PEOPLE HERE TELL YOU.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Each party picks a slate of electors for that state.  So if there are 9 electoral votes then they pick a group of nine people who will serve as electors.  After the popular vote in early November, the electors will gather, IIRC in early December, in their state's capitol and officially vote for the president.  In some states the electors are required by law to vote for whomever won the state's electors.  But that's not the case in all states.  In 2016, for example, a couple of electors from different states cast protest votes for random candidates.  But the electors are generally committed partisans, usually party activists or officials, and so the chances of large scale defection are nil. 

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    They don't decide.  The people tell them which way to vote.

    When there is a US presidential election, each candidate's party selects a slate of people in each state to be their candidate's electors.  The winning candidate in each state will have all their slate of electors chosen to represent the state.  There are two exceptions, Maine and Nebraska, where it's done by congressional district instead of state-wide, with just the final two electors chosen by the state-wide vote, so the electors there could be split.  So yes, except for those two, your last question is right - the electors vote for whoever won the state.

    So when the electors vote in December, the result should be exactly the same as the result we heard in November.  It WILL be if all the electors do as they are told.  A few don't but there have never been enough "faithless electors" to change the result.  Some states even make it illegal to be a faithless elector and the elector will be fined for not voting the way they were pledged to vote.

    The obvious question is why have electors at all, if they're supposed to vote the way they're told?  It's because it's in the constitution, and the constitution was written that way so each state could decide for itself how to choose its electors.  In the early days of the USA, some states didn't hold an election and had the state legislature choose them.  The first time all the states held an election wasn't until 1868.

    But now all the states DO get the people to vote, it would be possible to eliminate electors and just have the states award electoral points based on the people's vote.  Whoever gets most points wins.  But doing this would mean an Amendment, that's difficult, and the system works as it is as long as electors do as they're told.

    • Warren T
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      THERE IS NOTHING IN THE CONSTITUTION THAT RESTRICTS THEM FROM VOTING FOR WHOEVER THEY WANT

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  • 1 month ago

    The votes of the electors are supposed tp reflect the votes of the state.

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  • It depends on the state, but in most states, whoever gets the most votes gets the votes of the EC representatives for that state.  So if you beat your opponent by just 1 vote, you get all of the EC ,votes for that state.  Some states, like Maine, have it split up a bit, but for the overwhelming majority of states, the electors pick the majority winner.  If the elector goes to D.C. and votes in a way that they're not supposed to, then there are penalties, usually in the form of a fine.

  • Jeff D
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Prospective electors are typically chosen by each political party.  If that party's candidate wins the popular vote in that state, then their prospective electors become the state's electors.  Since they're chosen by the party, then they will almost always vote for the party's candidate.  In addition, some states have laws that require electors to vote for the candidate who won the popular vote (although there's a case before the Supreme Court challenging one of those laws).

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  • 1 month ago

    The electors are chosen by each state. In some states they are bound by law to vote for the person who gets the majority of the votes in that state. In other states there is not such limitation and an elector could vote for someone else if they choose to. Finally it is possible for a state to assign the electors proportionally based on the percentage of votes the various candidates get in the state. 

    • Warren T
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      FINALLY SOMEONE GOT IT RIGHT

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  • 1 month ago

    In most of them, they go to the winning party for that state, though not all have laws requiring the electors to choose the "winning" candidate.

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