promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted
Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Entertainment & MusicComics & Animation · 2 months ago

Do you think saturday morning cartoons was what killed of comic books once and for all?

It all started in 1990, comic books started generating buzz...by 1993 they were at an all time high with everyone wanting to read them, collect them, trade comic cards, and play games such as Magic. The shelves at your local pharmacy were filled with comic books everywhere on shelves and 'The death of Superman' comic was a always in stock. By 1995 saturday morning cartoons started kicking in. Looney Tunes, Ninja Turtles, Bobbys World, Batman, Anamaniacs, Darkwing Duck, Tailspin, Bonkers, etcetera etcetera.

People got tired of reading 'Comics' and found it much easier to just watch animated cartoon shows. The comic book fans of the 90's were now more into eating hot cheetos on the couch and watching cartoons and playing mortal kombat on Super Nintendo. We started growing fat and lazy. By 1998, Windows 98 came out, and thats when everyone discovered the 'Internet' and were more entertained by that. By 2000, the internet officially took over as the funnest thing to do and both comic books and saturday morning cartoons officially died out. Do you agree or disagree with this?

10 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    I disagree.  I stopped watching cartoons before I gave up on comics, right around that 2000 mark you mentioned.  The industry killed itself.  The improved quality of the presentation of comics increased production cost, which meant the price of comic books went up.  By 1993, I was paying over 2 bucks for some of the major titles.  Young kids couldn't afford to regularly follow multiple series if they were avid fans.  

    In the mid 90s the industry began banking on special editions and issue releases that ran an average of 3 to 5 dollars.  Certainly, there was a boom in children's entertainment up to the period, but I don't think it detracted kid comic book fan's interests.  The industry wasn't being kept afloat by little kids allowances, and paper route money.  The target "13 and up" demographic wasn't chipping in either.  

    • Ramiro
      Lv 4
      1 month agoReport

      Good answer and good point

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Diana
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I grew up watching Saturday morning cartoons and they inspired me to buy comic books that were related to my favorite shows.  

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    I think there were two main factors in the decline of comic books, the rise in telecommunications technology and greed.

    Cheap/free cellphones and less expensive internet access gave people more entertainment options, than books, tv, and movies. People were able to easily keep in contact with their friends (and strangers), play games (especially massive multiplayer games), or pirate IP (music, games, books, tv shows, movies, etc). This gave people more entertainment options than just buying IP (cds, DVDs, books, comic books, etc).

    Greed played a big roll also. The comic publishers went from telling stories in one to three comic books to stretching the stories to cover six or more comics. The cover price of comics also rose far faster than inflation. 

    Publishers were also quick to do second prints on popular comic books. This undercut some of the profit retailers made by charging more for comics in demand. It also made is less profitable for people to speculate in comic books as demand for special issues were met by additional print runs with no price increases. Less people speculated in buying comics, lower demand for comic book conventions, less convention dealers buying comics, and stores not selling to as many people went out of business.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • JerryL
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    no SJWs destroyed  comics it started in 2012

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • 2 months ago

    Cartoons were at their peak in the 80s I believe. And they were still pretty big in the 90s and early 2000s but yeah. Technology in general definitely played a part in wiping out the popularity of cartoons and comics. But also comics wiped comics. They kept putting out special editions and new number ones and people thought they were collectables that would rise in value but when they realized they weren’t worth money they just stopped buying them to the point that marvel went bankrupt. The market normalized but has never got back to how it was around 1993 or so. And yeah video games getting huge and the internet means the comic books will probably never find as much success as they had before, at least not in their current state. People say maybe going to a shonen jump model, 5 or 6 full issue length stories in one cheap $5 package, will bring comics back to having huge success again, but I doubt they’d do something like that. 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It's quite possible it's also quite possible that Saturday morning cartoons are responsible for the furry fandom! People that personify animals with human quality that's what the cartoons did!

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Kathy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I do not think so.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • C
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Oh man, do you really think Saturday morning cartoons only got big in the 90s?  I realise that the 90s might be the olden days to you but there were older days still and they were stuffed full of Hanna-Barbera cartoons.  Also, how do you square the popularity of the Saturday matinée double feature little kids were packed off to by their parents desperate for some alone time during comics original heyday in the 40s and 50s?

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    No. Saturday morning cartoon shows were at their peak of popularity in the 60s and 70s.

    So why are so many going out of business? Like other retailers on the high street, comic shops must factor in rents, business rates, staff wages, insurance – but the profit margins on comics are so narrow as to make this a very delicate balancing act.

    “There isn’t a huge profit in comics and graphic novels,” says Jared Myland of OK Comics in Leeds. “Nobody gets into comic retail to be a millionaire. We do it because we love comics. Unfortunately, closures are a more and more common topic on both sides of the pond. Most comic shops make enough to get by if they make cuts, but some retailers depend on the generosity of family and friends to help support the shop.”

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Saturday morning cartoons were all over TV when I was a kid, in fact I think they were better and more popular then than they are now.  But comic books were also very popular then.

    I think the same thing is killing comic books that killed magazines!  SOOO many other forms of entertainment, mostly available over the Internet.  In fact the Internet is killing TV as we know it.  It may eventually kill video games.

    Cartoons used to be cheaply made but clever and funny.  Now they're just really formulaic.  Most of them are just infomercials for action figures or some other product.  Strangely enough, the animated stuff we watch today is mostly for adults--Simpsons, South Park, Rick and Morty, Bojack Horseman, etc. etc. etc.  The really clever cartoons are the full-length features, and they're no longer really even cartoons! 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.