promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted
Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Pregnancy & ParentingNewborn & Baby · 2 months ago

Breastfeeding tips and tips for new moms?

We were going to use formula because our friends talk about how much breastfeeding hurts and how irritating it is at first. But we’ve decided to go with breastfeeding because it’d be the better option. This is also my first baby. So any tips and advice for breastfeeding and in general would be greatly appreciated

Update:

And tips for pumping so I can put breast milk in bottles and in the freezer 

9 Answers

Relevance
  • 2 months ago

    Just do normal breastfeeding and your baby will do great.  Plus, breast feeding does NOT hurt!  I raised three children, breast fed each from the day they were born until 9-12 months of age and it NEVER hurt.  Breast feeding is the most natural thing to do for your child.  No bottles to was, No formula to buy and NO messes at all and....a whole lot easier.  As for pumping.............why?  Your baby is the only 'pump' you need.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Hi...it's very individual as to how easy it difficult it is.

    I recommend breastfeeding only 4-6 months unless the baby is allergic to formula, or unless the mother doesn't mind. I only found it slightly painful on occasion but not in general.

    I had no issues with the amount of milk I produced not the baby latching on but I found it mentally exhausting and I wish I'd have stopped sooner than 18 months!

    Some babies may wean themselves but most don't. When you as a mother are done, it's ok to stop.

    I got a hand help pumping machine, it made me feel like a cow lol but I just did a few bottles when I could and had someone else feed the baby.

    • ...Show all comments
    • Diana2 months agoReport

      Its creepy and weird.  Yes Google it if you dont believe me. They usually only do it at night time 
      Look you dont gave to agree with me. Its just my opinion. I thinknif a woman is ok breastfeeding, great. I hated it after a year.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Pippin
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    There are many excellent books available. Your OB or hospital  probably offers a class.

    And make it clear to your 'friends' that you do not want to hear ANY discouraging words.  Breastfeeding should not hurt. Commit to sticking with it for at least 6 weeks. 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • LizB
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Work with a good lactation consultant, and if you want to build up a freezer stash for when you go back to work following maternity leave, the first 12 weeks is the best time to do so since that is when your supply will be highest. After that it regulates based on need/demand, and can be very difficult to increase in any significant way.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You have been given great tips for breastfeeding and since I didn't breastfeed, I can't offer anything else on that topic.

    What I will offer is a tip that you can use from day one and during the first one to two years of the child's life.  Babies wake often during the night.  It is common, expected, and required for them to get enough to eat.  HOWEVER, when taking care of the baby during the night, use the dimmest light that you possibly can - just enough for you to see with.  Avoid doing too much interaction of a playful nature during the night time feedings.  The baby needs to learn that night is for sleeping and not for interacting and playing.  By all means - hold the baby - feed the baby - give the baby everything they NEED - but AVOID extra playfulness or any kind of unneeded interaction during the night.  Reserve the playfulness for the daytime.  A baby can be easily over stimulated and bright lights and too much noise or interacting will cause the baby to want to stay up.  This becomes especially true from about four months to one  year old.  People who have trouble keeping their baby asleep at night might be overstimulating the baby with bright lights, loud voices, and too much interacting.

    This will NOT fix every sleepless night.  This will not guarantee that your baby would go right back to sleep after a nighttime feeding.  But it is a first step toward good nighttime habits that work toward the goal of having a baby that will sleep during the night and go back to sleep at night once their needs are taken care of.

    This worked with both of my daughters.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Breastfeed on demand, no schedling, no supplementing in the first weeks (ideally not for several weeks into months, if at all).  Supplementing will negatively impact your milk supply.  Lots of skin-to-skin contact.  Don't let people tell you you're feeding too often or holding the baby too much.  Newborns generally nurse pretty much around the clock.  That's normal and even desireable to establish and build milk supply.   

    If latch/breastfeeding is painful after the first week or so, see a lacation consultant.  Really, I'd even do it earlier if it was truly painful.  Breastfeeding can be painful at first, but shouldn't remain so.  If it continues to be, it generally means there's a latching issue.  

    As for pumping, you don't want to do that for a bit yet.  Earliest recommendation is about six weeks.   Before that, you can cause overproduction, or interfere with the baby's regular feeding schedule.  At that point, the best plan is generally to pump after the baby has fed. 

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Make sure that you and your baby are relaxed while breastfeeding, and if your baby struggles to latch on, then make sure to point your nipple towards the baby's nose, and they will be able to lift their head, open their mouth, and latch on. Also, make sure that you buy the correct size of a pump flange.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Well ...... make sure the toddler is getting plenty to eat .(?)

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Never underestimate the value of a high quality breast pump. It is not an area to scrimp.

    Pumps range anywhere from $20 to $200.   Some are manually operated, others are battery operated and others are electric.   Some can do both breasts at the same time which cuts down on time.

    Really think about where/when/how you will use it before you make a selection.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.