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Why do we usually only eat turkey on Thanksgiving and Christmas. why not more often?

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    Just tradition, really.  Though if you have a big family gathering, a turkey is a big bird and will feed more than a chicken.  At other times it would be too big.

    It's also quite difficult to satisfactorily roast a turkey.  If you cook it long enough for the legs to be done, the breast will be overdone and dry.  Stuffing the bird and rubbing butter over the breast inside the skin, or putting stuffing in there, will help.  So will wrapping it in foil.  This is not so much a problem with roasting a chicken because it's smaller.

    One solution is to cut the legs off and put them in the oven first.  Which leads to the idea of a turkey crown - this is a legless and wingless turkey, which essentially means you just have turkey breast on the bone and that will cook quicker and still be moist.  My brother-in-law, who is our family's Christmas chef, always buys one of those and that works with just 4 of us.

    I could say a thing or two on behalf of us in the UK, though - we don't have Thanksgiving, and at Christmas, a lot of it is likely to do with what Charles Dickens wrote in his very famous short novel "A Christmas Carol".

    If you haven't read it or seen any movie of it, Ebenezer Scrooge, a rich but miserly banker, gets visited on Christmas Eve by ghosts who show him the error of his ways.  They show the misery he has caused and how happy other people are with less.  He learns about the joy of giving and, to his surprise, discovers that what he thought was three nights of being shown things by three ghosts was in fact only one, so he wakes up on Christmas morning.  He feels sorry for how nasty he has been to his clerk, Bob Cratchit, buys the prize turkey in the local butcher's window - yes, nobody else has bought it! - and sends it round to the Cratchits.  How happy they are and even their crippled son, Tiny Tim, can say "God bless us, every one!"

    The traditional Christmas bird in the UK was goose, and it's probably due to Dickens that turkey took over.  Dickens also visited the USA and gave public readings of his books, so that may be why the same idea caught on there.

    • Blahblahblah2 months agoReport

      That's a little more information than what was asked for

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  • 2 months ago

    Many opt for turkey breast throughout the rear because a whole turkey is too large and most can’t or won’t break down one into freezable parts

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  • 2 months ago

    I eat Turkey a lot more then Dead PIG or DEAD COWS... I just do not do the stupid thing like cooking a complete turkey.. I cook more what I like like Breasts... and WHITE MEAT... I DO NOT LIKE THE DARK MEAT... NOT even Chicken..

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  • 2 months ago

    Because it's a lot of work

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  • e9601:
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    I eat turkey year round.

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  • 2 months ago

    who says u can' only eat Turkey for thxgvng or Christmas?  ...it's UR choice or ur parents choice if ur younger living at home..how often they do up a turkey dinner*...........Sometimes turkeys are expensive unless it's Easter/Thxgvng or Christmas time they are cheaper priced................but im sure YOU can cook up a turkey anytime u fancied* it doesn't just have to be Easter Thanksgiving n Christmas time*

    • e9601:
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      learn how to spell.

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  • 2 months ago

    You mean a whole, roasted turkey. Sliced turkey sandwiches are available at every deli out there.

    Whole roasted turkeys feed a lot of people and are a bit of a pain to cook, so they are appropriately a “holiday” meal.

    I cook turkeys whenever I like, mostly in winter, because I have to have the oven on for so long.

    I got into the habit of cooking turkeys years ago when I had an old dog, who for the last years of her life, would only eat roasted turkey. So I roasted a turkey about every 10 days. I (and my other dogs) also ate a lot of turkey during that time and I got to be expert at roasting turkey as well as figuring out creative ways use use turkey meat in all sorts of dishes (enchiladas being one of my favs). And lots and lots of turkey stock and soup...

    The best roasting technique is on the Deistel package, where you roast it in an open pan with a cup or so of water in the open pan, it’s a no baste method. And their suggestion of pouring a cup of white wine over the bird 45 minutes before it’s done for terrific gravy is spot on.

    So if you can FIND the turkey, cook it any time. Plan a week of meals around turkey. Be sure to use the carcass for stock and make soup.

    My local butcher at the health food store loved that I cooked turkeys so often, after the holidays he’d always have some in the big freezer leftover and would sell them to me at steep discounts because I was the only one buying them.

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  • John
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    Turkey don't grow on trees. Commercial slaughter is difficult since animals, you see, really don't WANT to die just to feed your greedy gut.

    So animals will do everything in their power to avoid the hatchet.

    Including letting the people that love them know they are being killed just because you want to shove their bleeding flesh down your throat in greedy abandon of lust for their flesh.

    Have you seen how you treat your sacrificial victims of your greed?

    Maybe you should look. They deserve royal treatment but you treat them like crap.

    • ...Show all comments
    • AskZilla
      Lv 5
      2 months agoReport

      God says eating animals is okay? So that makes it okay you knucklehead?. Glad I don't believe in your God. How would you like it if someone chopped you up alive?

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  • 2 months ago

    I eat turkey all year. Either ground or deli. I have roasted a whole turkey - a lot of work - at other times during the year, but not often. It's a lot of work.

    • John
      Lv 4
      2 months agoReport

      Ain't it turrible them turkey don't just chop their own haid off'en chuck thaimselves in thet pan en' saves ye all thet werk?

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Many people eat turkey year-round.   Ever heard of a turkey sandwich?  

    If you're referring specifically to a roasted whole turkey, many people do that multiple times in a year too.    Whole turkeys are available in the meat department of every grocery store 365/24/7.   Those who like roasted turkey and who are frugal will buy five or six of them when they are on sale at Thanksgiving and put them in their chest freezer at home.  

    Roasting a turkey isn't any harder than roasting a chicken.   When you can get turkey on sale it's a GREAT bargain.   There is no need to make all the fixings of a Thanksgiving dinner to roast a turkey.

    My mom loves turkey and will come up with just about any excuse to roast one.   Hell, she once roasted one for the 4th of July.   Sounds odd, but it was really good with typical summer sides like potato salad, cole slaw, fruit salad, etc.  

    "Why do we usually only eat turkey on Thanksgiving"

    Who is "we"?  Only you know why you eat what you eat when you eat it.  If you want more turkey, there's no one stopping you but you.   There are no turkey police.

    ETA:   Turkeys come in a variety of sizes, and unstuffed birds don't take that long to cook.  Prepping a turkey is no different than prepping a chicken.    Despite what others here are saying, it's really not a fussy or time consuming process.

    • Anton
      Lv 5
      2 months agoReport

      Mais Oui ! -- I can get Butterball turkeys for sale at under a dollar/pound.  Same as half hams.

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