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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Consumer ElectronicsMusic & Music Players · 2 months ago

Laser compact disc in analog format?

The music industry should introduce this format. If analog compact dish format is able to produce sound quality as good as vinyl records, why not?

Many music lover still prefer pure analog format. Analog format also make it difficult to copy it into a computer and thus can prevent unauthorized coping.

Vinyl records dynamic range of about 60db is more than enough for our daily music listening. We don’t need dynamic range of 120db which used in cinema.

Update:

There are people who don’t believe digital system is able to produce good quality sound. When you convert analog to digital and than covert digital back to analog, you introduce error.

Update 2:

and distortion!

Update 3:

Take an example, when you digitize a 11Khz sine wave.

with 44.1Khz sampling rate, that means a full cycle sine wave 11Khz will get about 4 samplings.

And than later when you convert the digital signal back to analog wave, and you plot this sine wave on a X-Y graph, you only got 4 dots on the x-axis, while there are 65,000 dots (resolution) on the Y-axis (16bits = 65,000 steps).

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago
    Favourite answer

    Maybe use Frequency Modulation (FM) recording to record audio into the laser CD?

    I remember the Hi Fi video tape use FM recording for the audio and I have heard very   good quality sound come out from those Hi Fi video recorder.

    FM recording/playback is analog.

    Thanks God, the FM broadcast is still FM, has not converted to digital broadcast.

    FM system maybe produce higher THD compared to Vinyl system, but so too does vacuum tube amp produce higher THD compared to solid state amp.

    But there are a lot of music lovers like vacuum tube amp.

    (Note: THD is Total Harmonic Distortion).

    • SSP Bowl Dude
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Laser discs used FM until they switched to digital .

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  • 2 months ago

    Well that is a interesting question. but I dont see how it would be possible. It would mean the laser would have to record into the disc the same way a cutter head cuts into a lacquer with a modulated analog grove, or somehow convert it to an electrical signal which means again it would have to convert it to an electrical pulse signal.  

    One gentlemen mentioned the laser turntable which does exist but it only reads regular records, and still picks up the ticks and pops of a dirty or scratch record.  It is very expensive and most feel it doesnt sound as good as a really good turntable setup.But for those who are into high end audio it is true analog weather its reel to reel or vinyl is a superior format sonically.  Digital even the best of digital just loses something in the conversion, contrary to what others will say.  Most people have never heard a good analog playback setup and are judging it based on listening to cheap or modest priced turntable, cartridge, phonostage setups.  unfortunately there are many cheaply and poorly made turntables on the market today simply because they are selling to the public who simply does not understand there is a difference in the quality of these turntables.  

    But yes good question and i have not seen or heard of anyone attempting what your asking and I really dont think it would work.  

    Kevin

    40 years high end audio video specialist

    • Kevin L
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      whos the idiot who gave me a thumbs down, it only confirms your ignorance on the subject !

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Original sound is analog by definition. A digital recording takes snapshots of the analog signal at a certain rate (for CDs it is 44,100 times per second) and measures each snapshot with a certain accuracy.

    This means that, by definition, a digital recording is not capturing the complete sound wave. It is approximating it with a series of steps.

    Attachment image
    • Robert J
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      That is an absurdly bad representation of digital reproduction, which takes no account of filtering and frequency response in the conversion back to analog.
      The output signal after conversion does not have steps, nor would sample points be off the original waveform!

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  • 2 months ago

    If you are so hot on this idea, 

    put up your own money to develop it.

           

    The rest of us will be happy to evaluate the results 

    when you get it to the beta test stage.   

         

    Until then, have fun working on it. 

         

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Sony and Philips of the Netherlands co-invented the compact disc. Philips originally wanted analog but Sony convinced it that the format should be digital. Therefore the idea of an analog format CD was considered but rejected.

    Yes there are people who swear by the analog format, and there are also people who prefer vacuum tube amplifiers instead of transistor. Personally I heard the arguments in support of analog but I find them silly. For example, people who want analog claim that the digital format is "antiseptic." They mean they do not hear any extraneous noise such as clicks and pops that they used to hear from their analog LP records. That is silly. The clicks and pops were never part of the music originally, and neither are the tape hiss that was part of the original analog master tape recordings of the oldest records. They are there because the technology was not good enough to eliminate them.

    The truth is that when CDs first came out, they were very expensive, costing $15 each in 1980s dollars. Yet classical music listeners adopted the CD format early, because they can now hear music clearly without clicks and pops even when they listen to the quietest passages. The dynamic range and low noise of the digital format is simply unequaled by the analog format. Further, if the analog format is used, instead of a series of pits, the compact disc must contain grooves that reproduce the loudest and the softest levels and must do so extremely accurately. It must at the same time fit the entire frequency range into the same grooves, from 20 hz to 20,000 hz. That is simply not possible using a small plastic disc.

    There are of course analog disc recordings using the analog format, and it predated the compact disc. The LaserDisk or LD was marketed by Pioneer, but it is a big format that cannot be fitted into the car stereo, unlike the CD format. It was also very expensie. The CD in contrast, cost only about $1 to produce commercially, about the same as an LP record to make. Yes there are people who like the analog format, but there are just not enough of them for any manufacturer to entertain the idea of producing them without losing their shirt.

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  • 2 months ago

    You have just explained to yourself why such a thing - or vinyl - is pointless compared to even basic CD digital audio!

    CD Audio is digitised and arguably has some fractional distortion and loss of quality because of that, but that distortion level is at something well below -90db !!!

    Vinyl cannot get near that (you say -60db, supposedly the best systems can reach around -70db) - but whatever it actually is, the quality of CD audio, distortion and all, has 20 - 30 db better dynamic range together with lower noise and distortion!

    Edit:

    The 16 bit range is amplitude and has nothing to do with time.

    Time between samples is dependant on the sample _rate_ which is 44.1 KHz for the CD Audio standard.

    There would be four sample points in a cycle of 11 KHz sine wave, correct.

    Those are taken and reproduced at 1/44100 second intervals.

    Think of the waveform on a graph, with points marked at regular intervals along the Y axis and then nothing but the point coordinates stored.

    When those points are re-drawn and a _smooth_curve_ drawn through them (not straight lines), the original waveform is very closely reproduced.

    The recreated signal is passed through a 20KHz low-pass filter which you could think of as limiting how sharply the "trajectory" of the reproduced waveform can change - there are no steps, it recreates a curve that fits the original points.

    Distortion exists, but is is extremely low - far, far below the level reproducible by LPs (vinyl).

    The fact is that CD Audio has a functional dynamic range of 96db.

    And that is a 40 year old standard - newer digital audio systems use higher bit depth (often 24 & sometimes 32 bit) and higher sample rates,  eg. 48, 96 or 192 KHz, giving far better dynamic range and lower distortion.

    (If you want to understand it better, study the Nyquist–Shannon theorem, audio filtering and Fourier analysis).

    The other side of the picture is that analog signals are degraded at every stage of processing - every transistor or resistor used adds noise (even if a minuscule amount), cable connections may add noise and hum..

    Every storage and reproduction process adds noise and distortion and every "generation" copy is worse than the previous.

    Digital processing is distortion-free; once digitised, audio (or video or any other digital format) can be copied, transmitted & stored through an unlimited number of systems or generations with no change, no noise introduced, no extra distortion.

    It's no different to copying text file, just numbers while in digital form.

    • Robert J
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      You do not understand digitisation - see the edit in my answer!

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  • 2 months ago

    You're asking for a vinyl record read by a laser.

    There are already turntables that do just that.

    • Kevin L
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Well he is not asking about reading a analog record with a laser ( which yes exists ) he is asking if you can record analog onto a compact disc

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  • Lance
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Personally I think the answer is going to be Hi Res music output...The problem with CD is the low bit rate that is right on the edge of acceptability. Actually CD has gotten better and sounds better today than when it was first introduced. The recording and mastering equipment has gotten better and the playback equipment has also improved although not as much as the recording equipment has.. but its too late because its developed a bad reputation that its not going to shake off....So I think eventually Hi Res music recording and output will be able to over come a lot of the distortion problems (Jitter; Quantization noise and distortion, Aliasing etc) associated with Digital Music. But first before that happens people in the recording industry must believe and consider that these types of distortions are a problem...Also if the price of hi quality Hi Res recording and mastering equipment that addresses these problems comes down, and also a delivery system that is accessible by non corporate entities at a reasonable price. I think you will see change occur. As the bit rates become higher and higher and recording and mastering becomes available with higher and higher resolution and less distortion at reasonable prices to street musicians and non corporate entities, you will see the corporations follow suit in order to keep up with the Hi Res revolution.

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  • 2 months ago

    Why ? More and more people are getting their music from streaming, such that analog record sales are now just an expensive niche market and CD sales have dropped by half in the last 20 years.

    Adding a new and inferior format would be costly, especially in trying to get stores or online sellers to stock it and as well from a who wants to try to manufacture and sell the needed players point of view.

    If sales of physical media were going up, even then it would be stupid as vinyl exists and CDs have far better range.

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  • 2 months ago

    the tech exists. RCA made it in like the 1950s-1980s as a video format. the format failed colossally against vhs video cassettes mainly because it took too long to develop. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnpX8d8zRIA

    Youtube thumbnail

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