Does it run up your electricity bill to shut off household appliances BUT keep them plugged in?

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    many things that have a red or green light (or a light of any color) on them when the machine is off - that light is the standby mode so the electronics stay warm so they INSTANTLY TURN ON.   Those are using a tiny amount of electricity - not enough to show up on your electrical bill as there is always a monthly minimum because you are wired to get power.  These lights also keep the memory of the electronics active.

    As an experiment, unplug the TV for an hour. After the hour, plug it back in and immediately turn on the TV.   It takes longer to start up.

    It is like unplugging the computer from the power source.   Then plugging it in and trying to turn it on.  The cold boot takes longer to complete before your machine is fully functional.

    Whereas if your machine is put into "sleep" mode MOST OF IT IS OFF, but it is still breathing.   

    With no power cold boot it was not even breathing so DEAD not asleep.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    There's something known as phantom electricity. This is the current that is used when something is plugged in while not being turned on.

    An example of phantom electricity use is a charger that's left plugged in to an outlet, your toaster, your television set, your microwave, and everything else that's plugged into the wall and not being used. I'm not quite sure how much that hikes your electric bill up per month, however it can be avoided by unplugging things you're not using or put certain things on a power strip and turn the power strip off.

    In my kitchen, I have a power strip under the upper cabinets where I have my microwave and toaster plugged in. The power strip is turned on only when either the microwave or the toaster is being used. I also have another power strip for the television, cable box, and to charge the batteries in my camera, my cell phone, the Bose speaker and the battery pack to my radio.

    If I want to use the space heater, I only plug it in when I'm using it. I don't leave my vacuum plugged in and less I'm using it as well.. during Christmas time I had my light decorations plugged into a power strip. In my guest bedroom, I've unplugged the lamps because no one uses them unless company is here.

    I don't know how much electricity is saved, but even if it's $5, that's $5 more I can put in my gas tank for gasoline

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      Passive devices like a vacuum cleaner or floor lamp, which don't have any remote-control features to turn on or off, don't use any power while they're switched off.  Any heater, on the other hand, should be unplugged when not in use, as a matter of fire safety.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Yes it does if they have a standby mode

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Some appliances have a small parasitic current draw, yes.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Some devices continue to use electricity even when turned off yet plugged in. That type of usage is called vampire power. Examples in my own home are the cable box, (which incidentally seems to use a lot of juice even while turned off), appliances that have clocks in them, garage door opener. Your heater/HVAC system has a transformer in it that is using juice even when the system is not turned on. Your door bell transformer is also drawing a very small amount. If your TV operates with a remote control, it is also using juice while turned off. Lots of vampire power!

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    The cost will not be more than a cup of coffee at Starbucks.

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