Mock mains board for testing purposes ?

I’m interested in making a mock mains board like the photo. The board will contain a Hanley 100 amp fuse, 25mm Tails, Single phase Meter, consumer box and a double plug socked. 

But am unsure how to supply electricity to this setup.. Would I be able to run a cable from a plug socket in my house to the 100amp fuse or would I have to replace the fuse with a mains cable adapter? 

I am starting my courses soon and wanted to build this to test a few things, any help would be great! I have done my own work on meters before I know the correct PPE to wear, how to carry out the correct tests when connecting and disconnecting the power supply and fault tests. I have installed / replaced meters before

The mock board will be located in a safe area. Once built i will be following the procedure without power until I know am comfortable then I will be connecting a power supply. 

Are you able to recommend the best way to supply power to the board? Would the layout I have drawn work?

Attachment image

3 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    Start off with what you are trying to accomplish. Once we do that, then maybe we can figure out a circuit. The one you suggest isn't going to get it done, whatever it is.

    • Robert J
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      It's a mockup of an absolutely standard to-the-regulations UK PME incoming power connection, metering and distribution setup.
      eg. https://electricalapprentice.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Earthing-Bonding.png

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  • qrk
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Looks like you're using a UK style plug. UK plugs are fused at 13 amps. Modern UK circuit breakers are around 32A. Why have a 100A fuse when your outlet can only supply 32A if you bypass the 13A fuse in the plug (not recommended)? The 100A fuse provides no protection. Perhaps you should use a fuse rated at something less than 10A so it can blow when you overload the circuit.

    Getting shocked by 240VAC is really unpleasant and can result in injury (usually your hand hitting a sharp edge when you react to the shock and giving you a nasty laceration).  Perhaps you should experiment with low voltage circuitry (12V) before jumping in to experiments that can hurt you.

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  • 1 month ago

    I can read most of the text, but the titles are vague and meaningless, such as "consumer unit" "single phase something".

    You keep using the term "plug socket", there is no such thing. You have plugs and sockets, and plugs plug into sockets. Something can't be a plug and a socket at the same time. I think you are way over your head and could kill yourself or cause a fire.First of all, a normal "plug socket" (ie, wall outlet) can provide 15 amps, so the 100 amp fuse is useless. 

    • Robert J
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      "Consumer unit" is the formal UK name for the main "fuseboard " or rather electrical  distribution board in the UK  premises wiring scheme.
      "Plug socket" is a (bad) nickname for a wall power socket...
      https://www.screwfix.com/c/electrical-lighting/consumer-units/cat7230021

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