Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureEtiquette · 1 month ago

Is it unprofessional for a JHS principal to make 8th grader (who isn’t graduating) to sit behind his class at graduation rehearsal?

Let’s say she doesn’t give him the option to stay in class during graduation rehearsal.  Instead, she tells him to sit by himself in the third church pew while his ten fellow classmates sit in the first two pews.  Therefore, he received his “pretend” diploma last, even though his surname isn’t alphabetically last in the class.

Obviously, it’s unprofessional for a boss to announce to the whole staff that he fired so ‘n so.  Instead, he/she would say via e-mail that “so ‘n so is no longer with the company and that we wish he/she well.”  Kind or ironic, since adults have to “man up” more than children, who are not allowed to be booed at talent shows.  You have to spare their feelings and not break their spirits, whereas, adults have to deal with the real world.  Therefore, is it socially acceptable for a principal to embarrass a 14-year-old.  Keep in mind that he was a problem child academically ONLY, and was a gentleman who stayed out of trouble and respected his teachers/never talked back to them.  But he had a learning disability, which caused the principal to treat him like the cliche student on TV who’s on her “sh*t list,” while he was nothing like Zack Morris (“Saved by the Bell”) or Bart Simpson.  Did the 8th grader really deserve that, or was the principal out of line and should be terminated?

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  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    sounds unprofessional to me too

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  • 1 month ago

    It is clear you are looking for validation, not a real answer.  But if you want a real answer, see below.

    No.  School and the work place are vastly different places so can't be compared fairly.  Many things at school are done to motivate the student and keep them included in their peer group.  Not allowing the child to participate in an activity all others were doing would serve to unfairly alienate them.  And keeping them in this activity can serve to motivate.  The only error her was not keeping him in alphabetical order, like everyone else. It was a good idea to involve him with his classmates rather than be assigned to be somewhere else, as that would only serve to alienate him making EVERYONE aware that he wouldn't be graduating, motivating unnecessary gossip.  Does this one error deserve to have someone fired?  Not in a million years.  And for your sake, I hope no one that hires you holds you to such a perfect standard, you apparently hold to others.  You know it is OK to just admit you are angry without demanding revenge.  Good Luck.

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  • 1 month ago

    it sounds unprofessional to me too

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    If the child is disabled enough that he can't function successfully, he should probably be in an alternate educational setting.

    Beyond that I'd need a lot more specifics, from all sides of the equation, to form an opinion.

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