Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 4 weeks ago

How many times were the Israelites enslaved?

I can only count 2 times, which are the Egyptian captivity and the Babylonian captivity

But please, tell me how many times the Israelites were enslaved

Hmm were they enslaved by the Greeks too?

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  • Nous
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    It was the TRIBES of Israel and that is why there are lost tribes!!!!!!!!!! They were mostly NOMADIC and not a country! Israel as a country only came into existence in 1946 when it was formed by taking Palestinian land!

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  • JASON
    Lv 5
    4 weeks ago

    Does Hitler using them as a labour force count?

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  • sarah
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    The Romans over took them and when Jesus came they expected him to destroy the Romans. Which he did not and later they destroyed themselves. Oral and anal sex was rapant and they were full of diseases since sex was oso popular and they died from the inside of disease and war.

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  • Laila
    Lv 6
    4 weeks ago

    At the time of the supposed enslavement of the Hebrews in Egypt, most of Canaan was actually ruled by the Egyptians during the reign of Thutmose III. 

    How could the Hebrews have escaped? 🤔

    Prior to Egyptian rule, Canaan was ruled by the Akkadian Empire. After a while, the Assyrians conquered the last of the Akkadian kings, whilst other independent kingdoms rose.

    Canaan was also known as Phoenicia at one time. The Phoenicians, the purple ones, a name given to them by the Greeks, because of their trade in purple dye, ruled most of Canaan building many city states along the coast. 

    The Carthaginians were originally Phoenicians who had set up colony in what is now Tunisia. The Punic wars were such named by the Romans, because of the connection the Carthaginians had with Phoenicia.

    The Israelites rose up from Canaanite/Phoenician rule when the Egyptian Empire receded. The Philistines, a Phoenician people, ruled for a short time. 

    Eventually, however, the Israelites became so wealthy and powerful during the reign of King Solomon, they were viewed as equal trading partners. Various Israelite and Judean kings ruled until another great power came along.

    The Assyrians developed a great civilisation and a powerful army and conquered Israel and all of Canaan. The Israelite kingdom was destroyed and the Israelites were exiled to what is now northern Iraq. Only the Phoenician city of Tyre remained independent. 

    However, the Assyrians also fell and the Chaldeans, arose and wanted a return to Akkadian culture and became the Neo Babylonian Empire. The Neo Babylonians then ruled Canaan, destroyed Jerusalem and took the Hebrews into exile. 

    Then, the Persians defeated the Babylonians and as a result conquered the rest of Canaan and the Hebrews had new rulers again. The Persian Achaemenid Empire ruled Canaan and the entire Middle East as far as India. 

    Of course, along came Alexander the Great of Macedon. He defeated Darius of Persia and as a result, Canaan and the Middle East was ruled by the Greek Macedonians. Even the city of Tyre fell to Alexander. It was the first time in history the Phoenician Tyrians had been conquered.

    After Alexander died, Ptolemy, a former Macedon general, ruled Canaan and the Hebrews from Alexandria in Egypt. However, a descendant of another former general of Alexander, Seleucus, defeated the Ptolemies and the Seleucid Empire ruled the Hebrews and Canaan.

    Then, the Romans came along. Then, the Byzantine Empire (technically Roman).

    Various other empires came and went. A new Persian Empire, the Arabs, with the Islamic Conquest, the Ottoman Empire and even the British Empire ruled the land of Canaan, aka Palestine. 

    But, now Israel finally has its own state and own rule. 

    A bit more than two rulers who “enslaved” the Hebrews. 

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  • 4 weeks ago

    The Romans in the second century (see: the Bar Kochba Rebellion)

    I don't believe that they were enslaved wholesale by the Greeks at any time. Certainly they were conquered by the Greeks several times.

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  • Derek
    Lv 5
    4 weeks ago

    In that ancient time, to be defeated in battle by another ruler meant your country was conquered with some survivors being taken captive and others being left to do what they could with broken cities and the scorched earth policy. That's the sense of slavery, not like it is today. They were subjugated. In that sense, lots of times. In 722 Samaria was captured by Tiglath Pileser after a 3 year siege; people deported (2 Kings 15 - 17). Then in 714-701 came the Assyrian invasion of western Palestine (2 Kings 18 onwards). The first deportation of Judah to Babylon was in 605, then came another in 597 when 10,000 Jews were taken captive into that city (2 Kings 24:10-17 & 2 Chronicles 36:10). The final destruction of Jerusalem with another deportation to Babylon was in 586 (2 Kings 25 & 2 Chronicles 36:17-21)

    Complicating this was that Israel had been divided into 2 kingdoms during that time so there were other subjugations for the Northern kingdom. In 722 came destruction and deportation to Bablyon for them. Also, there were Persian invasions. In 530 Cambyses (Ahasuerus) conquered Egypt and halted the rebuilding of the Temple in Jerusalem to appease the Samaritans. But as the Persians repatriated prisoners, Cyrus allowed the return of some 50,000 Jews. You asked about the Greeks. Alexander the Great visited Jerusalem in 33 BC, was shown the prophecy of Daniel which referred to him, so he spared the city. But in 320 Judea was annexed to Egypt by Ptolomy Soter. In 203 Antiochus the Great took Jerusalem and defiled the temple. In 63 Pompey invaded Palestine and Roman rule begins, the Jews in subjugation to the Roman empire. Not exactly slaves, but paying heavy tribute and bound by Roman laws. So there was a lot of coming and going and its up to you to decide how you're going to count it all. 

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  • 4 weeks ago

    I think three (2-1/2?).

    The Syrians also conquered and enslaved to a certain extent the northern Kingdom of Israel around 722 BC.  Note the passage below.

    2Kg 5:2 Now bands of raiders from Aram had gone out and had taken captive a young girl from Israel, and she served Naaman’s wife.

    I'm not sure how that enslavement compared to the other two.  It appears to have been more sporadic.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Depends on the time frame you are talking about. Their history covers more time then the Bible does.

    In the Bible, we are told that they were enslaved in Egypt and led out by Moses.

    Under the Judges they were enslaved (still within Israel) by several different neighboring tribes. None of those tribes enslaved all of Israel. It is unclear exactly how many enslavements there were as some of them may have been the same event told by different tribes of Israel.

    They remain free during the time of Israel/Judah monarchy begun by Saul/David/Solomon. That would split into two nations (Israel and Judah) after the death of Solomon

    The Northern nation of Israel would be enslaved and carried away by the Assyrians. While many of the Israel would eventual make their way back to the land, there was no formal ending of that captivity. That is why they are often considered to be "Lost Tribes".

    the southern nation of Judah would be enslaved by the Babylonians and exiled. However they would be allowed to return to the land 70 years later. The Old Testament adds just after their return to the land (around 500 BC)

    The nation would later be enslaved by Alexander and the Greeks. This is in the gap between the Old and the New Testaments. (Although the Catholic Bible includes a history book that covers this period.)

    The Greek Empire would be overthorwn by the Romans, who would have ruled Israel at the time when the New Testament begins.

    Israel would be destroyed as a nation by the Roman (and future emperor) Titus in 70 AD, and all the Jews exiled from the land.

    They would not return as a nation until 1948 AD.

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  • Mack
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    The Egyptian captivity has never been confirmed, not even by Israelis....

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  • 4 weeks ago

    The answer could actually be zero times.

    Since Jews did not name the Egyptian pharaoh in their holy texts, then it calls the credibility of the writings into account. Surely he is significant in the telling of the tale?

    At the very least, I am highly suspicious of their version of events.

    It's possible they were slaves at the hands of the Babylonians instead of the Egyptians, but that's not what their holy texts say either.

    As for being slaves of the Greeks who knows, but again there is no mention of this.

    The entire supposed history of the Jews could be a complete fabrication. We are likely to never know either way for sure.

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